Category Archives: Calls for Papers, Articles, Translations

CFP: Central Asian Literatures in Translation

Call for Proposals and New Book Series: Central Asian Literatures in Translation

Academic Studies Press (Boston, MA) is pleased to announce the launch of “Central Asian Literatures in Translation.”

This series focuses on literary texts by non-Russian peoples of the former Soviet Union, with an emphasis on Central Asia and the Caucasus, while also engaging with the literatures of cognate geographies and neighboring terrains. Rather than prioritizing regional rubrics, “Central Asian Literatures in Translation” supports the translation of underappreciated classics from across the temporal spectrum, and of new work that pushes the boundaries of contemporary literary form within a Eurasian literary context. We welcome titles that redefine what literature can be and mean in a region wherein geopolitics too frequently mutes aesthetics. Ranging across a geography known for its tendency to resist categorization, our titles make the most of the capacious relations to place, space, culture, and power that mark the literatures of Turkic and Persianate Central Asia, Georgia, and Armenia, and in other indigenous languages of the Caucasus. In conceiving of literature from the point of view of the post-Soviet postcolony, this series offers a new way of studying world literature beyond imperial paradigms.

Series Editor: Dr. Rebecca Gould (University of Bristol) specializes in the literatures of the Persian and Islamic world (especially the Caucasus). Her first monograph, Writers and Rebels: The Literature of Insurgency in the Caucasus (Yale University Press, 2016), examines literary memorializations of anticolonial violence in the literatures of the Caucasus. Alongside her work on classical and modern Persian, Georgian, and Arabic literatures, she maintains an active interest in the intersections of anthropology and social theory with textual methodologies. Her translations include After Tomorrow the Days Disappear: Ghazals and Other Poems of Hasan Sijzi of Delhi (Northwestern University Press, 2016, from Persian) and The Prose of the Mountains: Tales of the Caucasus by Aleksandre Qazbegi (Central European University Press, 2015, from Georgian). Future translation projects include poetry by Titsian Tabdize and prose by Idris Bazorkin and Mirza Fath-‘Ali Akhundzadeh.

The editorial board comprises the following scholars and translators:

Professor Jeanne-Marie Jackson (Johns Hopkins University) published her first book, South African Literature’s Russian Soul: Narrative Forms of Global Isolation (Bloomsbury/Continuum), in 2015. It is centrally concerned with how Russia’s nineteenth-century “Golden Age” of literature and ideas provides a model for the study of South African forms and epistemologies both during and after apartheid. It also advances a broader argument for realism’s maturation through historical upset and alienation rather than social and economic stability. Through paired readings of nineteenth-century Russian texts and their South African successors, the book ultimately asks how traditions that manifest a deep sense of isolation in the world make us ask harder questions about global methodologies. She is now at work on a second book project called The African Novel of Ideas: Intellection for the Post-Liberal Age. It charts the relationship between the novel and philosophy, both formal and institutional, at key sites of African intellectual development from the early twentieth century through the present day.

Professor Erdağ Göknar (Duke University) a poet, literary translator, and scholar whose research focuses on the intersection of politics and culture in the Middle East; specifically, the late Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. He is interested in exploring questions of Turkish and Muslim representation in literature, historiography, and popular culture/media. This includes examining tensions between city and nation at the nexus of representational and political power. His work has focused on the political critiques of state ideology embedded in literary and historical tropes in the work of authors like Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk and on the critical role played by writers in representations of political violence, such as cultural revolution, military coups, and colonial occupation. His award-winning translations include Pamuk’s My Name Is Red (Knopf, 2001) and Atiq Rahimi’s Earth and Ashes (Harcourt, 2002); his study Orhan Pamuk, Secularism and Blasphemy: The Politics of the Turkish Novel (Routledge) was published in 2013; and his collection Nomadologies: Poems (Turtle Point Press) appeared in 2017.

Professor Roman Utkin (Davidson College) specializes in twentieth-century Russian and Soviet poetry, prose, and visual culture, with emphases on comparative modernisms, exile, urban poetics, and queer theory. His current book project, tentatively titled Russian Berlin: Culture of a Modernist Diaspora, explores the ways Russian émigré authors forged an alternative Russian tradition abroad. As a native speaker of both Tatar and Russian, Utkin is also interested in the cultures of Russia’s non-majority peoples, Turkic avant-gardes, and ethnic difference in a transnational world.

For more information, or to submit a proposal for inclusion in the series, please contact: Rebecca Gould (r.gould@bristol.ac.uk)

Visit the series page here: https://www.academicstudiespress.com/central-asian-literatures-in-translation

CFP: Authority, Memory, Transgression, Glasgow

Authority, Memory, Transgression: Trends in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies, Postgraduate Conference, May 5th 2017, the University of Glasgow

On Friday, May 5th 2017 the University of Glasgow is hosting an interdisciplinary postgraduate conference entitled Authority, Memory, Transgression: Trends in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies. This event follows on from the successful postgraduate conference held in Glasgow in 2015, and the aim is to provide a forum for discussion about new directions in both these expanding interdisciplines.

If you would like to offer a short paper ( 15 minutes) please send an abstract by April 15th to Susan.Bassnett@glasgow.ac.uk and to Michael.Syrotinski@glasgow.ac.uk.

There will also be a poster session – please indicate in your email if you would like to be considered for a poster display instead of a paper.

Invited speakers will include Professor Susan Bassnett (Glasgow), Professor Michael Cronin (Dublin City University), and Professor David Johnston (Queen’s University Belfast). Be as adventurous as you like: we want provocative discussions and some genuinely innovative thinking.

Click here for more information.

CFP: Endgame(s) – GLITS

Endgame(s), GLITS (Goldsmiths Literature Seminar) Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference, June 9th 2017, Goldsmiths, University of London

Plenary Speaker: Professor Ivan Callus, University of Malta

Website: www.endgames2017.co.uk

We live in perilous times. Institutional decay, declining living standards, the collapse of social welfare, and potentially the end of liberal democracy all afflict our contemporary historical moment. Looming ecological and migratory issues transcend the limits of what we think and feel to be possible, threatening us in ways we are unable to imagine, let alone rationalise. Yet, there is a profound sense that every epoch has its own ‘endgame’; that every society recognises itself as itself in the vision of its own future demise. Endgames consequently populate the historical record, from the Millenarianism of the medieval world and the fin de siècle culture of Mitteleuropa, to the historical ends that the mythologies of Fascism and Stalinism sought to bring about, to anxieties of nuclear holocaust and the Y2K millennium bug and – more recently – Brexit. It seems that the apocalypse, by definition, must be repeatable. In 1925 T.S. Eliot captured appositely the sense of resultant disaffection and numbness – even frustration – this engenders: ‘This is the way the world ends, Not with a bang but a whimper.’

However, living in the end-times can also be exhilarating, even liberating. A German expression encapsulates this hedonism: ‘Tanz auf dem Vulkan [dancing on the volcano]’. The end-times – different from the mere knowledge of our individual mortality – can trigger an ecstatic sense of being, perhaps even a means to bridge the intersubjective gaps that lie between us and forge new collective possibilities. Thus, leading us to the imagining of termination for positive affect; bringing current socio-economic and political systems to their [il]logical conclusions; repurposing technology for socially beneficial and emancipatory ends.

This conference seeks to explore the way in which literature and narrative cultures order and represent visions of the end of the world and how this constitutes a pervasive influence on philosophy, political theory and popular culture. We invite papers that discuss ways of thinking and feeling in the end times, those of the past, present and, inevitably, those endgames still to be played out in the future.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Literature of resistance, dissidence, change, from the middle-ages to 21st Century.
  • The end of literature and the contemporary novel.
  • Borders and limits in relation to migration, displacement, and refuge.
  • Apocalypse, catastrophe and revelation.
  • Climate-change, environmental disaster, and eco-criticism.
  • Corruption, decadence, degradation, decay.
  • Endgames and end-times in popular culture.
  • Epochality, historicity, temporality.
  • Technology and media.
  • Post-truth and Post-fact discourses.

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20 minute papers, short creative pieces, and readings, from all postgraduate students by Friday 31st March to be sent to the conference organisers David Cross and Marc Farrant at endgames2017@gold.ac.uk – Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words. Please include details of your current level of study and home institution. For creative readings, please send a short example of your work.

CFP: Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

16th-17th June 2017

University of Oxford, St Hilda’s College/ Faculty of Classics

Keynote speakers:

Carole-Anne Upton (Middlesex University London)

Margherita Laera (University of Kent)

Lorna Hardwick (The Open University)

Liliane Campos (Université Paris Sorbonne-Nouvelle)

The poetics of theatre translation and adaptation is often dependent on the intimate knowledge of the expectations of the target audience. Understanding the evolution of theatre translations, the success or failure of some productions or texts requires a full understanding of the social context, and should therefore not be limited to a textual study alone.

In our current world, where individual countries are becoming more and more multicultural within themselves, understanding the societal implications of cultural exchanges becomes ever more complex and fundamental. Although one tends to rely primarily on the social sciences to reflect on society thanks to their quantitative and empirical investigations, the aim of this conference is to show that the theory and practice of theatre translation can significantly benefit our understanding.

In turn, we hope to see how the field of theatre translation can benefit from the methodologies of social sciences. In recent decades, the concepts and methodologies of theatre translation have recurrently been questioned. For instance, the popular terms ‘performability’ and ‘speakability’, conveniently used to describe a poetics of reception and often criticised for their lack of theoretical framework, could be conceptualised further in light of these new tools.

Focus of scholarship on theatre translation has recently departed from the European-American sphere and developed a welcome extension into new geographical spaces. It is, therefore, all the more necessary to incorporate an input from the social sciences (anthropology, ethnography, sociology, history, politics, international relations etc.) into the discussion.

A particular focus will be given to stage performance, from the point of view of both the performers and the audience. Because performances tend to be historically and culturally-rooted, translations in performance bring practical insights into the target society. The recent thriving interest in performance of Latin and Greek plays, which obeyed radically different cultural codes to ours, could be of particular relevance to this conference.

Proposals from across humanities and social sciences are welcome. Papers should be 20 minutes long, and potential speakers are very welcome to propose a case study which may be open to new possible theorisations in the field of Translation Studies. They may want to consider the following themes, but need not treat the list as prescriptive or final:

Links between theatre translations/adaptations and shaping identities as a social group

          Relevance of quantitative research and theatre translation

          Lines of connections between theatre anthropology and theatre translation

          Translating ideology and political resonances

          Theatre translation as a political/social engagement

          Theatre translation and the history and theory of international relations

          Staging intercultural translations

          Rehearsal ethnography

          Theatre translation and sociolinguistics

          Multilingualism

          Theatre translation and comparative cultural studies

          Theatre translation and modern economics

          Theatre translation in history

          Cultural/social determinism in theatre translation

          Promotion of endangered cultures/social minorities through theatre translations

Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biography to
oxfordtheatretranslation@gmail.com before the 9th April 2017.

The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation

Warwick launches cash prize to help transform translation into English

The University of Warwick is launching The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation, which will be awarded for the first time in November 2017.

The prize aims to address the gender imbalance in translated literature and to increase the number of international women’s voices accessible by a British and Irish readership.

Quote from Professor Maureen Freely, Head of English and Comparative Literary Studies and President of English PEN: “We’ve come a long way with the championing of world literature over the past decade, welcoming in a multiplicity of voices which have gone on to enrich us all. In the same period, however, we’ve noticed that it is markedly more difficult for women to make it into English translation. This prize offers us an opportunity to welcome in the voices and perspectives that we have missed thus far.”

A recent report by Nielsen Book showed that translated literary fiction makes up only 3.5% of the literary fiction titles published in the UK, but accounts for 7% of the volume of sales. If translated literature as a whole is underrepresented on the British book market, then women’s voices in translation are even more peripheral. The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, for example, was awarded 21 times, but was won by a woman only twice.

The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation will be awarded annually to the best eligible work of fiction, poetry, literary non-fiction or work of fiction for children or young adults written by a woman and translated into English by a female or male translator.

The prize money of £1000 will be split equally between the female writer and her translator(s). Publishers are invited to submit titles from April 3, 2017. The shortlist will be announced in October and the winner will be announced in November.

Quote from Professor Emeritus Susan Bassnett: “This prize is a rallying call to translators and publishers everywhere. There are dozens of fine women writers waiting to be translated – so let’s see more of them in our bookshops.”

Quote from Chantal Wright, Associate Professor of Translation as a Literary Practice, who is coordinating the prize: “This initiative would not have come about without the efforts of the wider literary translation community. Their efforts in raising awareness of the gender imbalance in translated literature were instrumental in the creation of the prize.”

The judges:

  • Boyd Tonkin, Senior Writer and columnist at The Independent
  • Susan Bassnett, Emeritus Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Warwick
  • Amanda Hopkinson, literary translator and scholar

Three years in the making, The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation is the product of a collaboration between the School of Modern Languages and Cultures and the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick and is sponsored through the university’s Connecting Cultures Global Research Priority. Warwick offers two Masters programmes and a PhD in translation, in addition to a variety of translation modules at the undergraduate level.

More information can be found here.