Category Archives: Events of Interest

The BCLA At Home (SOAS)

THE BCLA AT HOME
Saturday, 18th November 2017
SOAS, University of London
Brunei Gallery – B 102

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From Thesis to Publication (12.00)Training session and discussion aimed especially at postgraduate students and early career academics, led by:

Dr Graham Nelson (Oxford ), Managing Editor of the Legenda (home to the BCLA’s own Studies in Comparative Literature, as well as Transcript and other interesting series).
Dr Richard Hibbitt (Leeds), Editor of the BCLA’s journal Comparative Critical Studies.
Prof Sanja Bahun (Essex), Associate Editor for Feminist Modernist Studies.
Prof Ben Hutchinson (Kent), Editor of Palgrave Studies in Modern European Literature.

Members of the BCLA Editorial Committee responsible for selecting publications for Studies in Comparative Literature will also be present and happy to answer questions.

Sandwich Lunch (1.30), featuring the Award of this year’s Arthur Terry Postgraduate Essay Prize

AGM & Open Meeting of the Executive Committee (2.15)

Wine Reception (5.00), featuring President Prof Susan Bassnett (Warwick) in conversation with Prof Matthew Reynolds (Oxford) and members of the BCLA

Please come and join us for this interesting and convivial day!

CFP: Prototypes in Recycling Cultures

CFP: Prototypes in Recycling Сultures and/or Cultural Genomes, 20-21 April 2017, Baku Slavic University, Azerbaijan.

Baku Slavic University and the Azerbaijan Comparative Literature Association (AzCLA) have the pleasure of inviting all interested specialists and postgraduate students to take part in an international conference “Comparative Literature and Culture: Prototypes in Recycling Cultures and Cultural Genomes”, to be held at Baku Slavic University in 20-21st April 2017. The conference is part of the “Criteria of National Literature and Culture” project.

The concept of culture, which may seem far-removed from politics, can both unite and divide people, races and countries. The other – the foreign, the unusual, the stereotypical as an alien phenomenon – always prompts interest at the very least and, “if required”, becomes a reason for conflict in politics. This applies to various religious faiths, to languages and customs and models of behaviour. Moreover, it’s well known that many cultures have not simply points of contact, common elements, not only with related cultures (those which scholarship recognizes as related), but prototypes which unites with cultures that are a long way away in time (right back to prehistoric times) and space (right up to different continents), without being limited to the political borders of modern countries.

Confirmed keynote speaker: Sowon Park, Assistant Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Sowon specializes in British Modernism, Political Fiction, relationship between Literature and other forms of knowledge, in particular Cognitive Neuroscience.

Discussion at the conference is expected to cover the themes below, but are not limited the following:
• How “contemporary” are contemporary cultures and how authentic are they?
• Cultural heritage of deleted from modern-day history ancient people was somehow divided, transformed and branched in a new historical and geographical area. How were ancient, earlier versions of contemporary traditions? What were the predecessors of contemporary traditions and beliefs such as, for example, offering sacrifices?
• How were shaped up-dated alphabets? Are there prototypes for them?
• Words represented symbols in alphabets, and with the acquisition of local features and traditions, are carriers of cultural layers. This conference aims to consider associations between modern words and ancient words if they are transformations, or cultural matrix.
• What were or are the names of the same objects, traditions or phenomena in the different languages of people who share the same faith?
• How has the same cultural element been interpreted and reinterpreted; for example rites or genres, such as khamsa, kitab or nama in literature, marsiya or march in music? How has the development of writing and translation influenced commonality in the formation of many contemporary words?
• We do not exclude consideration of the question of “recycled cultures” in the context of “recycled genomes”. How great a role did natural selection play in the transmission of different elements of cultural heritage? Can we speak of cultural memory as we do of biological memory?
• How can “The Human Genome Project (HGP)” shed light on these issues? How unrelated are these contemporary cultures? Why do differences in culture promote aggression rather than mutual understanding when people have the same physical characteristics?

The “Prototypes in Recycled Cultures and Cultural Genomes” conference offers joint discussion of the interdisciplinary problem of “recycled culture” from different aspects and historical times, including the proto-historic (pre-literate) period, offering, a shared platform to researchers in different academic fields – specialists in literature, linguistics, religion, anthropology, music theory, translation, philosophy, architecture, history, genetics etc.

If you are interested, please send your abstracts (150-200 words max) along with a brief CV to rahilya_g@hotmail.com by 25th February 2017.

OCCT Hilary 2017

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation

 Hilary 2017 Events

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

Week 3 – “(Re)writing Fragments”: Reflections on Translating Poetry

Mon. 30 January 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Sarah Ekdawi (Oxford); Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford); Graduate Respondent: Spyros Karelas (Athens/Oxford); Chair: Eleni Philippou (Oxford)

Week 3 – Fiction and Other Minds: Modalities of Reading

Wed. 1 February 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Naomi Rokotnitz (Oxford); Renate Brosch (Stuttgart); Chair: Ben Morgan (Oxford)

Week 4 – “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

Thurs. 9 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death; Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford)

Week 5 – Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Wed. 15 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Nicky Harman; Chair: Kate Costello (Oxford)

(No knowledge of Chinese required, to register refer to OCCT website)

Week 6 – Translation as Afterlife

Wed. 22 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College

Speakers: Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan); Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Chair: Matthew Reynolds (Oxford)

Week 7: Writing an Academic Review

Wed. 1 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Marilyn Booth (Oxford); Chair: Dennis Duncan (Oxford)

Week 8: Online and Offline Forums for Cultural Production

Wed. 8 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: TBC

More details, including individual descriptions of each session, can be found here.

www.occt.ox.ac.uk; http://www.facebook.com/CompCritOxford; @OxfordCCT
Contact: comparative.criticism@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

Conference: Languages and Creativity, Oxford

Creative Multilingualism Conference: Languages and Creativity, Saturday 28th January 2017, Taylor Institution Library, St Giles, Oxford.

Conference Programme

9.00 – 9.30
Registration and Coffee

9.30 – 9.45
Welcome
Janice Carruthers, Queen’s, Belfast, and AHRC Leadership Fellow in Modern Languages

9.45 – 10.30
Writing between Languages
Wen-chin Ouyang, SOAS, and Jane Hiddleston and Matthew Reynolds, Oxford

10.30 – 11.15
Panel Discussion – Working Languages
Chair: Leanne Tritton, Managing Director, ING Media

11.15 – 11.45
Coffee

11.45 – 12.30
Sense and Nonsense across Languages: the Example of Bird-Naming
Andrew Gosler and Martin Maiden, Oxford

12.30 – 1.15
LinguaMania – Evaluating Impact
Chair: Elleke Boehmer, TORCH, Oxford

1.15 – 2.00
Lunch

2.00 – 2.30
Multilingual Metaphor
Linda Fisher, Cambridge, Suzanne Graham, Reading, and Katrin Kohl, Oxford

2.30 – 3.30
Panel Discussion – Multilingualism post Brexit
Chairs: Rajinder Dudrah, BCU, and Wen-chin Ouyang, SOAS

3.30 – 4.00
Tea

4.00 – 5.00
Languages in Performance: RTKAL (Punch Records)
Q&A led by Philip Bullock, Oxford, Julie Curtis, Oxford, and Rajinder Dudrah, BCU

5.00 – 5.30
Perspectives

5.30
Drinks Reception

Entry to the conference is free, but numbers are limited so booking is required. Please register here.

For more information, please email us at: creativeml@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

Creative Multilingualism is a research programme led by the University of Oxford and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of the Open World Research Initiative.

Majorities and Minorities: Literature and Identities, Text and Context, SOAS University of London

Majorities and Minorities: Literature and Identities, Text and Context, 28th April 2017, SOAS University of London

“Minor literature is not the literature of a minor language but the literature a minority makes in a major language.” Deleuze and Guattari

“The three characteristics of minor literature are the deterritorialization of language, theconnection of the individual to a political immediacy, and the collective assemblage ofenunciation.”  Deleuze and Guattari

What makes individuals or communities belong to the minority or the majority? How do authors’ positions within the minority-majority paradigm influence their fiction? Can we even formulate what minorities are? Do they have to be a minority in regard to a specific majority? Is it possible to define a majority? What does being marginal mean and how is it expressed in a work of art? How does the nation figure in defining minorities and majorities? What is the nation-state’s role in minor-major relations?

This conference will focus on the many different kinds of minority voices emanating from South Asia in the decades since independence. Any South Asian language and any form of minority identity is welcome.  By bringing scholars researching different voices from different languages in South Asia we aim to foster a dialogue that will help develop a South Asian paradigm of Minor Literature and help to identify the role of the state and different parallels across the subcontinent.

We would like to invite all scholars working on Indian or other South Asian literatures to submit an abstract on any of these or related areas.

 Caste and community

 Gender and sexualities

 Religions and traditions

 Marginalised geographies

 Poverty and class

 Minor literature in nationalisms and regionalisms

Paper proposals should include a title, 300-word abstract, institutional affiliation and contact information. Please submit proposals via email by January 15 2017 at the following address: samconference2017@gmail.com