Category Archives: Events of Interest

CFP: New Approaches to Counterculture (Edinburgh)

New Approaches to Counterculture: Art, Politics, and Technology in Rebellion and Reaction

Institute for the Advanced Study of the Humanities

University of Edinburgh
12-13 April 2018

In 1969, Theodore Roszak’s The Making of a Counter Culture: Reflections on the Technocratic Society and its Youthful Opposition coined the modern usage of the term used to define a generation of misfits and revolutionaries, hippies and drug-users, and other cultural and political insurgents and rebels. With nearly 50 years of hindsight, it’s easy to identify short-comings in Roszak’s commentary on the trends and thinkers guiding so much youth culture of the 60s; but his warnings of a ‘technocratic totalitarianism … wholly estranged from everything that has ever made the life of man an interesting adventure’ may still ring a note of dissent with the art, music, literature, philosophy and politics formed in era of the rationale of the market.

Surprisingly, however, the language of the countercultural is now often as likely to be used to describe the so-called ‘Alt-Right’ as it is the radical youth culture of the 60s. On 17 February 2017, for example, the Independent online, in response to claims in the media, published an op-ed entitled, ‘There’s a very simple reason why the alt-right is not the new counterculture’ – the reason being that there is simply no dominant culture to counter. On the other hand, some, such as film-maker Adam Curtis, has argued that, in spite of itself, the counterculture has contributed to the development it originally sought to break with.

With these issues in mind, for this workshop we invite speakers to propose 20-minute papers on the international counterculture in contemporary discourse, or reconsiderations on the artistic or historic counterculture of the 1960s and 70s. Papers are encouraged to address any of the following questions:

  • How is counterculture identified in the 21st century?
  • What artistic and literary practices are identifiable as counter-cultural, and what new theories can be brought to the study of countercultural arts?
  • Does counterculture still retain the possibility of resistance, or have the processes of commodification and capitalisation definitively circumvented any resistant potential?
  • How are countercultural movements bounded by national cultures, or influenced by changes within the national culture?
  • How has counterculture changed with the internet and social media? Can counterculture exist as an exclusively online phenomenon or must it establish a presence in physical space or command of material resources?

Keynote speakers will include Professor Jeremy Gilbert (University of East London) and Dr Katharina Karcher (University of Bristol).

Speakers will also be invited to discuss their themes or expertise on a podcast hosted on the IASH website. Podcast conversations, intended for non-academic audiences, will be about speakers’ interests as researchers on counterculture or simply as enthusiasts of countercultural arts, literature, politics and history.

Please submit abstracts of 250 words, as well as a short bio (50 words) by 15 January 2018 to iash.counterculture@gmail.com. Please note that the will be a £5 registration fee for the conference.

http://iashcounterculture.wordpress.com

Minding Borders: Launch and Discussion

Monday, November 27, 2017 – 12:45 to 14:00
Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College, University of Oxford

 

Please join us for a discussion to mark the publication of OCCT’s latest book, Minding Borders: Resilient Divisions in Literature, the Body and the Academy, edited by Nicola Gardini, Adriana Jacobs, Ben Morgan, Mohamed-Salah Omri and Matthew Reynolds. The authors will be in conversation with Matt Longo whose book The Politics of Borders: Sovereignty, Security and the Citizen after 9/11  is also out this month.  ‘Rather than celebrating the crossing of borders, or dreaming of their abolition, Minding Borders traces their troubling and yet generative resilience. It explores how borders define as well as exclude, protect as well as violate, and nurture some identities while negating others. The contributors range comparatively across geography, politics, cultural circulation, creativity, and the structuration of academic disciplines, hoping that the analysis of borders in one domain may illuminate their workings in another. Whatever other form a border takes it is always also a border in the mind.’

More information can be found here.

CFP: The Interpretation of Nizami’s Cultural Heritage in the Modern Period

The Interpretation of Nizami’s Cultural Heritage in the Modern Period, Nizami Ganjavi Centre, Baku, Azerbaijan, 13th March, 2018

The Nizami Ganjavi International is seeking paper, panel and roundtable proposals for an interdisciplinary conference to be held at the Nizami Ganjavi Centre, Baku, Azerbaijan on 13th March, 2018. We are looking for presentations within the broad topic of the interpretation of cultural heritage in the recent stage(s) of history based on the example of Nizami’s poetry. The topic encompasses questions of identity in cultural heritage: for example, the interaction of new identities with existing identities or the change in the parameters of identity over time – from the criterion of ethnicity to that of the state, from religion to language.

The conference aims to cover both theoretical and practical aspects of the topic, such as the criteria for the national attribution of literature and culture, irredentism, shared cultural past, and the aesthetics of Nizami’s poetry. We encourage consideration of irredenta within the literary-cultural framework rather than the political one, both from the point of view of the metropolis, and the peripheries, including in post-socialist countries, and Canadian Quebec, Belgium, from local and global perspectives. We welcome papers on all areas relevant to the topic, viewed through various spatial and temporal prisms, and from participants from different backgrounds, with special focus on the following topics:

Regional motifs, symbols in Nizami’s literary work (recycling cultures in literature, Khizr, the reversed love story of Shamash and Enkidu)
Ethical and philosophical values in Nizami’s literary heritage
Folklore elements and esoteric symbols; common elements and symbols
Islamic and regional elements
Nizami and his contemporaries
Nizami’s influence on modern literature (e.g. Ptisin’s “Khosrov and Shirin”, Khlebnikov’s “Medlum and Leyli”)
Collapsing countries, transitional periods and new approaches to cultural and national identity
Shared pasts, irredentism and new approaches to classical heritage
Splitting identities, migration and the rethinking of new identities
Established identities: between classical culture and folklore
Criteria for the identity of literary and cultural heritage
Interpretation and re-interpretation of the past based on the example of Nizami’s heritage
Paper proposals (no more than 150-word abstract for a paper to last 15 minutes, brief CV, contact information) should be sent by 18th December 2017 to: rahilya_g@hotmail.com

Abstract deadline: 18th December 2017
Notification of acceptance: 25th December 2017
Deadline for full paper submission for conference: 15th January 2018
Conference Date: 13th March 2018  (arrival: 12th March 2018)

The West-Eastern Lyric Modernist Poetry between Asia and Europe (SOAS)

The West-Eastern Lyric Modernist Poetry between Asia and Europe
 17 November 2017 9:30 – 6.30, SOAS, 21/22 Russell Square, Room T101

Organised by MULOSIGE ERC project (SOAS) and the Centre for Modern European Literature (University of Kent)

All Welcome! Please Register via Eventbrite.

In Enlightenment Orientalism (2012), the late S. Aravamudan argued that the popularity in 18th-century Europe of the “Oriental tale”, a genre practiced by several celebrated early English and French novelists, calls for a revision of the standard view of the novel as an originally European product that was then disseminated throughout the world. In another essay (2014), Aravamudan noted that ‘narratives of influence from “East” to “West” are often subject to special pleading, contingency, and “accidental sagacity,” whereas influences from the “West” to the “East” involve formulations deriving from scientific necessity, historical causality, and colonial power’. Categories of genre, in other words, seem to have been conflated with categories of power.

This workshop will consider the implications of this insight for lyric poetry. Exploring the many lives of “Eastern Poetry” and the ways in which its circulation across several languages challenges any understanding of modernism along a “single Greenwich meridian of world literature” (Casanova), it will examine the way that poetic styles, themes, and strategies developed in a multi-way process of cultural transfer between Asia and Europe, across Europe and across Asia. Translations, pseudo-translations, re-translations and free versions of “Oriental” poems, often under the umbrella term of “Eastern poetry”, proved enduringly popular among a whole range of European readers and poets from the late-19th century to the early 20th century, from Pound to Rilke to Michaux. Translations by the likes of Edward Fitzgerald, Edwin Arnold, and E. Powys Mathers circulated and were re-translated by “Eastern” poets, who in turn gave these poems new lives. Lyric poetry, in short, became an intercontinental genre.

The programme is available at:

https://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/events/17nov2017-the-west-eastern-lyric-modernist-poetry-between-asia-and-europe.html

Fatima Burney (Mulosige, SOAS)

Ben Hutchinson (University of Kent)

Francesca Orsini (SOAS)

CFP: Balzac and England (Maison Française d’Oxford)

Balzac and England / Balzac et l’Angleterre, Maison Française d’Oxford

12th – 14th April 2018

Balzac’s is one of the world’s greatest authors. One of the main realms of his influence is Britain, in and through English, and the Anglophone world. This, the first ever conference on Balzac and ‘England’, organized at the Maison Française d’Oxford by the University of Oxford, the University of Birmingham and the Groupe d’Etudes balzaciennes, explores the nature of his engagement with Britain, but also of Britain, and of the world’s engagement with Balzac. Papers may cover, but are not limited to, a number of key themes: 1) The presence and influences of British thought and writers in and on Balzac: philosophy, politics, economics, law; Shakespeare, Milton, Sterne, Locke, Scott, Otway, Richardson, Byron, Adam Smith; 2) Britain and the British in and through La Comédie humaine and Balzac’s wider work: British characters, landscapes, politics, economy, mores; 3) British responses to Balzac in his own age: Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Wilde, James; Permissiveness and Censorship; Nationalism and Morality; nineteenth-century reception and criticism of Balzac; translation, press, publishing and pedagogy; school and university editions). 4) The responses of posterity: Balzac criticism and creation in Britain; novelistic and non-novelistic and non-literary (artistic, musical, poetic, political) responses; theatre, film, TV, radio and Internet adaptation; Balzac criticism and theory; school and university syllabuses and teaching; press, publishing and translation; individual and series publications. 5) État présent and future perspectives: the Anglo-American critical tradition; English translation as a vector for world-wide appreciation, criticism and theory. In asking in relation to this greatest and most penetrating of novelists the trans-linguistic, trans-cultural question of what, precisely, yet diversely, Angleterre and ‘England’ might designate, the conference raises fundamental questions about identity, literary conception and nationality which led the nineteenth century, and may still yet shape the twenty-first.

Proposals for individual papers or panels (250 words maximum) should be sent as an e-mail attachment in Word, in English or French, to the conference organisers (Tim Farrant, University of Oxford; Owen Heathcote, University of Bradford; Michel Lichtlé, Université Paris IV Sorbonne; Nathalie Preiss, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne; and Andrew Watts, University of Birmingham) at balzacangleterre@gmail.com. The deadline for proposals is 10th November 2017.

Balzac et l’Angleterre, Maison Française d’Oxford

12 –14 avril 2018

La réputation de Balzac n’est bien sûr plus à faire. Si son influence mondiale est énorme, l’un de ses domaines majeurs est la Grande-Bretagne, par la présence des versions originales de ses œuvres, et par le biais de la traduction de ses œuvres en Anglais et leur dissémination à travers le monde anglophone. Le Groupe d’Etudes Balzaciennes propose maintenant en collaboration avec les Universités d’Oxford et de Birmingham le tout premier colloque sur « Balzac et l’Angleterre ». En réunissant des spécialistes français, britanniques, américains et mondiaux il se donne pour objet de considérer la nature de l’engagement de Balzac avec l’Angleterre, mais aussi de réfléchir sur l’identité de l’« Angleterre » et sur la nature des interférences entre l’Angleterre, la littérature anglophone et Balzac. Les communications pourront traiter, entre autres, les thèmes suivants : 1) Présence(s) et influence(s) sur Balzac de la pensée, de l’imaginaire (philosophique, politique, juridique, économique – voir A. Smith) et des écrivains britanniques (entre autres Shakespeare, Milton, Locke, Otway, Sterne, Richardson, Byron, Scott); 2) La Grande-Bretagne, l’Angleterre et les Anglais dans La Comédie humaine et les autres œuvres de Balzac (personnages, paysages, mœurs, langages) ; 3) réception britannique ou quasi britannique contemporaine de Balzac (Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Wilde, James, Wharton…) ; permissivité et censure ; nationalisme et moralité ; réception et critique de Balzac au dix-neuvième siècle : traduction, presse, édition et pédagogie ; éditions scolaires et universitaires ; 4) Réponses et réception de la postérité : critique et création balzacienne en Angleterre ; réactions romanesques, littéraires et autres (artistiques, musicales, poétiques, politiques, Internet ; adaptations théâtrales, cinématographiques, télévisuelles, radiophoniques, nouveaux médias ; Balzac, critique et théorie ; cursus et programmes scolaires et universitaires ; presse, édition et traduction ; éditions individuelles et en série ; état présent et perspectives futures : la tradition critique anglo-américaine ; traductions anglaises comme vecteur de réception et d’appréciation, de la critique et de la théorie mondiale. En posant, à propos de ce romancier entre tous le plus grand et le plus pénétrant, la question translinguistique et transculturelle de savoir à quoi précisément pouvaient, peuvent et pourront renvoyer les termes « Angleterre », « England » et « Grande-Bretagne », il soulèvera des questions fondamentales sur l’identité, la conception et la création littéraire et sur la nationalité, questions qui ont conduit le dix-neuvième siècle et pourraient encore façonner la nôtre.

Les propositions (250 mots maximum) pour des interventions individuelles ou des séances entières sont à adresser par courriel, en anglais ou en français, au comité d’organisation (Tim Farrant, University of Oxford; Owen Heathcote, University of Bradford; Michel Lichtlé, Université Paris IV Sorbonne; Nathalie Preiss, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne; and Andrew Watts, University of Birmingham) avant le 10 novembre 2017 à l’adresse suivante : balzacangleterre@gmail.com.