Category Archives: Symposiums

CFP: Translating for the Stage: Translating on the Stage (Oxford)

Translating for the Stage: Translating on the Stage, Symposium: 13th January, Workshop: 11-13th January, University of Oxford, Maison Française

Special Guest: Catherine Hargreaves, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts et Techniques du Théâtre, Lyon

The symposium will take place after a three-day practical workshop run by director, actor and translator Catherine Hargreaves, professor at ENSATT, France. Speakers are invited to register for the workshop in addition to the symposium if they wish (see description below).

Call for Papers

While the domestication of cultural references is often seen as crucial in theatre translation, pursuing efficacy in speeches is just as important: the translator needs to have an ear for the potential performance of the text and its ‘speakability’. The demands of the stage tend to cut short the ethical debates on the positioning of translation between source and target text, and justify the choice for adaptation rather than translation. Over the past decades, translators and critics have defended the need to test translations on the stage, and the cooperation between the different agents of the theatrical project – in other words, the interdependence between translation, adaptation and interpretation. Collaborative translation benefits the actor by alleviating their verbal obstacles (Johnston 2004), and the director by assisting them in the interpretation of the text, as well as its reception, favouring the clarity and credibility of the text (Peghinelli 2012).

Sometimes collaborative translation also benefits the translators themselves, as it elevates their subaltern status and gives them visibility (Fernandes 2010); or benefits the source text, as it helps to retain the effects produced by the original (Zatlin 2005). This practice also benefits theatre translation as a discipline, as it can open up several avenues of research. For example, because the idiom generally aspires to embrace the target culture’s sociolect in a given time and to be as efficient as possible, studying the history of all available translations prepared for performance of a particular play could bring some insights into the evolution of language usage and the norms of theatrical efficacy. Just as the practice and the study of stage-oriented translations have entailed the emergence of theatre anthropology as an almost autonomous area of research, such historical study has the potential to open up to theatre sociolinguistics as a new subfield of the discipline.

This study day may also focus on the flaws of collaborative translation, and aims to foster debate on the practice. First, collaborative translation relies heavily on the notions of ‘speakability’ and ‘performability’, which are still under-conceptualised and sometimes controversial. Second, the necessity and the legitimacy of collaborative translation and naturalistic-driven theatrical writings can legitimately be criticised.

While case studies are welcome, we will favour proposals that particularly contribute to the theoretical reflection on collaborative translation. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes and suggested themes are as follows (although this list is not prescriptive):

–  Mechanisms and purpose of collective translation

–      Politics of rehearsals: power struggle and visibility of the translator

–    Collective translation and commercial theatre

–    Ethical considerations

–    Social sciences: sociolinguistics, historiography, anthropology, rehearsal ethnography

–    Defining, pursuing or rejecting ‘speakability’

Please send your abstract or any questions to cedric.ploix@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk by 1st November 2017. The committee will review the abstracts in the following week.

The symposium will end with an open workshop in which speakers will be given the opportunity to join for free or to attend (knowledge of French not essential for this workshop), followed by a round table.

Workshop

The workshop will explore the relationship between language and acting. How can the use of different languages influence an actor’s presence, develop his practical skills and sensitivities and modify meaning? What happens on stage when a same scene is played in different languages? Or in several languages at the same time?

After a series of exercises, designed to reveal how the rhythm and sound of a given language carry the history and cultural background of a society, the participants (theatre practitioners and literature students) will work on performing English and French versions of the same scenes and on improvisations linked to multilingual devised theatre. Time will be spent on analyzing the different performances and figuring out together if the stage can and/or should influence the translation of a play. The authors and translators of the plays will be invited to join the workshop.

The scenes will be taken from English and French contemporary plays. Knowledge of French is required to participate, but no theatre experience is required.

Lunches will be provided.

Registration for the workshop (11th-13th January, 10am – 4pm): £15

Registration for the symposium: (13th January): Free

Bibliography

Fernandes, Balduino Alinne Pires, ‘Between Words and Silences: Translating for the Stage and the Enlargement of Paradigms’, Scientia Traductionis, n° 7, 2010, 119-133.

Johnston, David, ‘Securing the Performability of the Play in Translation’, in Sabine Coelsch-Foisner and Holger Klein (eds),Drama Translation and Theatre Practice, Frankfurt, Peter Lang, 2004, 25-38.

Peghinelli, Andrea, ‘Theatre Translation as Collaboration: A Case in Point in British Contemporary Drama’, Journal for Communication and Culture 2, n° 1, 2012, 20-30.

Zatlin, Phyllis, Theatrical Translation and Film Adaptation: A Practitioner’s View, Clevedon, Multilingual Matters, 2005.

In from the Cold: Northern Noir

Free, one-day event on Northern crime writing, crime fiction translation and criticism at Europe House, London Wednesday 18 October 2017.

Over the past decade there has been a boom in Northern European crime fiction – in books, film and on television. Characterised by dark, wintry settings and even darker themes, this ‘Northern Noir’ frequently addresses important questions about crime, social welfare, immigration, gender, family and marginalised, vulnerable citizens. This special symposium brings together some of Europe’s best crime writers, translators and critics to discuss the characteristics of northern crime fiction. How does crime fiction in Britain differ from Northern Europe? What are the cultural similarities and differences? Is it possible to define a recognisable ‘northern’ tradition of crime writing that crosses national borders? Our packed programme includes author interviews, readings and panels, academic talks, a translation slam and public workshops.

Entrance to this day of events is free but places are limited. You must reserve your place in advance and specify the ONE workshop you would like to attend. Stricter security measures are in place at Europe House so each ticket booked must indicate the actual name of the individual ticketholder.

You can reserve your ticket and view the full programme at the following website: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/in-from-the-cold-northern-noir-tickets-36860915992

CFP: Of Borders and Ecologies (Birmingham City)

Of Borders and Ecologies: Comparative Literature and the Environment, The NCLN 3 rd Annual Symposium, Hosted by the School of English, Birmingham City University, 28 October 2017

The Northern Comparative Literature Network (NCLN) is a platform for scholars in the midlands and the north of the UK who study literature across boundaries of language, culture and nationality.

CALL FOR PAPERS

The environment does not respect borders. The effects of ecosystems’ degradation cross all boundaries, including those of nations, cultures and languages. Among the questions raised by contemporary ecocriticism is that of borders, especially perhaps, the limitations of anthropocentrism and the boundaries between the human and the non-human. In terms of literature and the environment, Timothy Clark has articulated the question along the following lines: Can anthropomorphism, the tendency to attribute human qualities to nature, offer a way of understanding the non-human environment, or is it a form of solipsism wholly determined by human consciousness? To problems of epistemology come questions of ethics: Does the Anthropocene require, as Timothy Morton’s writings on ‘hyperobjects’ suggest, an extension of ‘personhood’ to aspects of the non-human world? Meanwhile, renegotiations of Marx’s ecological thought have sought to recognise the unacknowledged labour of the natural world in capitalist value creation, thereby breaching the apparently closed borders of economic systems (Foster: 2000), whilst McKenzie Wark’s Molecular Red (2015) has attempted to broach the perceived gap between high theory and individual ecological praxis.

This one-day symposium, organised by the Northern Comparative Literature Network, invites papers that explore contemporary engagement with the environment in postcolonial, world and planetary literatures. How might Comparative Literature make a distinctive contribution to the understanding of literature and the environment? For this symposium, we are particularly interested in literary scholars working on questions of the environment and ecocriticism in the 20th and 21st centuries. Although it is not a strict requirement, preference may be given to comparative approaches that move across the boundaries of nationality, culture and language.

We are currently in talks with literary journals as we plan to publish a selection of papers delivered at the symposium in a themed issue (scheduled for publication before REF 2021).

Topics may include:

 Planetary and World Literature

 Hybrid and creole literatures

 The unsettling of species boundaries and post-humanism

 Romanticism, ecofeminism, postcolonial eco-justice, animal welfare and deep

ecology.

 Ecology vs ‘nature’

 Planetary/world ecological history or memory, and its literary representation

 ‘Eco-cosmopolitanism’ (Heise, 2009) and its representation in literature

 Aesthetics, forms and themes of ‘world-ecological literature’ (Deckard, 2017)

 The Anthropocene vs. ‘the Capitalocene’ (Moore, 2014)

We welcome abstracts and expressions of interest in NCLN from established scholars, postgraduates and researchers. Abstracts of 250 words for papers lasting around 20 minutes should be forwarded to Peter Jackson peter.jackson@bcu.ac.uk or Tom Knowles thomas.knowles@bcu.ac.uk by Monday 11 September 2017

OCCT: Oxford Translation Day, Trinity Events

Oxford Translation Day, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 3rd June 2017

OTD Poster

On June 3rd, St Anne’s College will be running Oxford Translation Day, a celebration of literary translation consisting of workshops and talks throughout the day at St Anne’s and around the city, culminating in the award of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. Oxford Translation Day is a joint venture of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize and Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (the research programme housed in St Anne’s and the Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities), in partnership with the Oxford German Network and Modern Poetry in Translation. All events are free and open to anyone, but registration is required. To register go to Eventbrite or see here: http://www.occt.ox.ac.uk

The programme can be found here.

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Week 4 – Poetic Currency Symposium (Collaboration with Stanford University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) Poetry Reading and Keynote Address. Wed. 18 May, 5:00 -7:30pm; Seminar Room 10 in the New Library, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Kristin Grogan (Oxford). Poets: Claire Trévien (UK); Tahel Frosh (Israel); Roy ‘Chicky’ Arad (Israel)

Week 4 – Poetic Currency SymposiumThurs. 19 May, 10:30 -16:30pm; Seminar Room 5, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Eleni Philippou (Oxford); Kasia Szymanska (Oxford); Idan Gillo (Stanford); Anat Weisman (BGU); Shira Stav (BGU); Roy Greenwald (BGU)

Week 5 – Fiction and Other Minds: Enacting Fictional SpaceWed. 24 May 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building. Speaker: Merja Polvinen (Helsinki); Respondent: Terence Cave (Oxford)

The OCCT 2017 Trinity programme can be found here – a detailed description of each individual event, here.

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness

CFP: BCLA and SELGYC Postgraduate Joint Session

10-12 November 2016, Santander, Spain; Spanish Society of General and Comparative Literature (SELGYC)

The Spanish Society of General and Comparative Literature (SELGYC) is pleased to announce the XXI SELGYC Symposium, which will take place at the Palacio de la Magdalena in Santander, 10-12 November 2016.

We hereby invite all the BCLA postgraduate members who are interested in participating in a panel to send an abstract of their paper proposal (maximum 300 words) and a short bio-note by 23 September 2016 to xxisimposio.selgyc@gmail.com.

The Symposium’s scientific committee will carry out the revision and selection of the proposals received, and the results will be communicated by 31st September 2016. During the selection process of the articles, factors such as originality, composition, bibliography, method and adjustment to the themes proposed by the XXI Symposium will be taken into account.

Papers should address one of the general themes of the symposium:
1.- Las artes de la vanguardia literaria / The arts in avant-garde literature
2.- Shakespeare y Cervantes: 400 años después / Shakespeare and Cervantes: 400 years after.
3.- El sujeto migrante / Migrants

Papers will be presented in different sessions, as will be announced in the final program. Each author will have 15 minutes for presentation followed by 10 minutes Q&A.

PLACE: Palacio de la Magdalena (Santander – Cantabria).
DATE: Thursday 10th, Friday 11th and Saturday 12th of November, 2016.
LANGUAGE: English or Spanish

Deadline for proposals (BCLA postgraduate members): September 23rd, 2016.

Further information can be found here.