Category Archives: Workshops

Landscapes of Realism, SOAS

Landscapes of Realism: Workshop 5. ICLA Project (supported by the Leverhulme Trust Network Fund), 17 and 18 February 2017, S209 (Senate House, North Block), SOAS, University of London

Topic 1: Institutions and Ideologies of Realism: mapping out realist conventions; readership and expectations; canonization; production and circulation.

Topic 2: Cultural Encounters: (a) comparative study of how realist texts portray the other, the foreigner, stereotypes; and (b) the overlap and divergence between truth and reality in theories of knowledge and representation in non-European philosophical and critical traditions. How is Realism to be understood within a worldview that sees reality as illusion and its transcendence or abandonment as homecoming? What if experienced reality contradicts directly received divine truths? What then is real and how is it known and theorized? What impact do such worldviews have on the representation of what can be seen, heard, sensed, and comprehended, and on the development of non-European aesthetics and relevant literary theories? More crucially, what happens to the non-European theories and modes of representation when they encounter European Realism in the C19 and C20? How may non- European responses to Realism be explained within the broader context of imperialism, colonialism, resistance and revolution? How does Realism serve as both framework and foil for non- European interrogation of both Eastern and Western traditions of critical thought on the true and the real?

Workshop 1: Friday 17 February 2017

Institutions and Ideologies of Realism

10:00-10:15 Arrival tea & coffee

10:15-10:30 Welcome Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS) and Simon James (Durham)

10:30-12:00

Chair: Simon James (Durham)

Newspapers and their Beginnings: Fiction, Journalism, Realism

Edmund Birch (Churchill College, Cambridge)

‘A space of stunted grass and dry rubbish’: realism and ‘equal ground’

Simon Grimble

Women, Work, and Periodical Literature

Margaret Higonnet (University of Connecticut)

12:00-13:00 Sandwich lunch

13:00-15:00

Chair: Simon James (Durham)

Melodrama, Theatricality and Realism

Jeremy Tambling

Global Capitalism and the Novel

Bashir Abu-Manneh (Kent)

Literature and Education in the 1930s: Arthur Calder-Marshall and Winifred Holtby on Schools

Matthew Taunton (UEA)

Experimentation and Innovation in the Twentieth Century, Social Realist Short Story

Anthony Patterson

15:00-15:30 Break tea & coffee

Workshop 2 (a): Friday 17 February 2017

Cultural Encounters

15:30 to 17:00

Chair: Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS)

The Fictitiousness of Reality: Ḥussein Barghoutī’s Conception of Realism

Haneen Omari (Leiden University)

Respondent: Bashir Abu-Manneh (Kent)

Displaced Realisms: Machado de Assis in the 19th and 20th century

Paulo Lemos Horta (New York University Abu Dhabi)

Respondent

The Transmedia and Transcultural Hyperrealism of Ai Weiwei’s Digital Communication

Daria Berg and Giorgio Strafella (University of St.Gallen, Switzerland)

Respondent: Steen Bille Jorgenson

18:30 Workshop dinner

Workshop 2 (b) Saturday 18 February 2017

Cultural Encounters

10:00-10:30 Arrival tea & coffee

10:30-12:30

Chair: Alena Rettrova (SOAS)

Time and Space: A First Sketch

Svend Erik Larsen and Rosa Mucignant

What if experienced realty contradicts directly received divine truths?

Stephen Hart (UCL)

Realism at the Peripheries

Ulka Anjaria (Brandeis University)

Realism and Other

Midori Atkins (Independent Scholar)

12:30 -13:30 Sandwich lunch

13:30-15:00

Chair: Stephen Hart (UCL)

Russian idleness, European business: work and commerce in 19th-century Russian realism (Andrea Zink, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Cultural Determinism: The Emergence of the Statistical ‘Real’ in the 19th Century

Genie Babb (SUNY Plattsburgh)

The Colonial Gaze and its Critics in Nineteenth-Century German Realism

Dirk Göttsche (Nottingham)

Respondent: Alena Rettrova (SOAS)

End of Public Programme

15:00-15:30 Break tea & coffee

15:30 to 17:30 Business meeting (Network members only)

18:30 Workshop dinner

Abstracts can be found here.

Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation: Nicky Harman on Jia Pingwa, Wed 15 February 2017, 17:15 – 19:15. St Anne’s College, Oxford, Seminar Room 3.

The Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation research programme is delighted to host acclaimed literary translator Nicky Harman to give a masterclass on Chinese to English literary translation. During the course of the evening, we will focus on unpicking a single paragraph by author Jia Pingwa. Concentrating on the final paragraph of Jia’s 2007 novel Happy (《高兴》), we will look at the process of a working translator, with an eye to issues particular to Chinese-English translation. Through examining both the translator’s drafts and and her final version, we will discuss the practical problems of translation, starting with sentence structure, terminology and (nick)names. Nicky will then unpick the cultural references, both implicit and explicit, and finally consider the author’s intentions for this paragraph. The conversation with then open up for discussion, as the translator poses the question of whether her translation has succeeded in recreating the same effect in English.

All are welcome. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary. A few short preparatory readings will be circulated in advance to facilitate audience participation. Please register on eventbrite in order to receive the introductory readings. Please come prepared to ask questions!

Please contact Kate Costello with any questions about the event or registration.

OCCT Hilary 2017

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation

 Hilary 2017 Events

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

Week 3 – “(Re)writing Fragments”: Reflections on Translating Poetry

Mon. 30 January 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Sarah Ekdawi (Oxford); Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford); Graduate Respondent: Spyros Karelas (Athens/Oxford); Chair: Eleni Philippou (Oxford)

Week 3 – Fiction and Other Minds: Modalities of Reading

Wed. 1 February 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Naomi Rokotnitz (Oxford); Renate Brosch (Stuttgart); Chair: Ben Morgan (Oxford)

Week 4 – “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

Thurs. 9 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death; Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford)

Week 5 – Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Wed. 15 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Nicky Harman; Chair: Kate Costello (Oxford)

(No knowledge of Chinese required, to register refer to OCCT website)

Week 6 – Translation as Afterlife

Wed. 22 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College

Speakers: Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan); Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Chair: Matthew Reynolds (Oxford)

Week 7: Writing an Academic Review

Wed. 1 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Marilyn Booth (Oxford); Chair: Dennis Duncan (Oxford)

Week 8: Online and Offline Forums for Cultural Production

Wed. 8 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: TBC

More details, including individual descriptions of each session, can be found here.

www.occt.ox.ac.uk; http://www.facebook.com/CompCritOxford; @OxfordCCT
Contact: comparative.criticism@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

Responding to Crisis – Workshop and Poetry Reading

Responding to Crisis: Forced Migration & the Humanities in the 21st Century, AHRC-funded project, Keele University, 5th October 2016

  1. Workshop: ‘Contemporary crisis of values and ‘necropolitics’ (12.00-16.00)

This  workshop consists of  5-10 minute presentations from speakers which include academics, practitioners, activists and artists (among which are Neelam Srivastava, Maggie O’Neill, Anthony Good, Roger Bromley, Jerome Phelps, Robert Hampson, Saradha Soobrayen, Carolina Albuerne).

Participants will illustrate the ways in which their current/recent work and activities engage with the deathly context of contemporary migration to Europe, which results in both literal and social deaths. As re-evaluations of humanism and humanitarianism continue, what role can/does the humanities play in discourses of forced migration? What methodologies do different sectors use to approach mass migration and displacement?

The overall aim of the workshop is to explore diverse approaches among activists, practitioners and academics to  the current ‘crisis’; hence, a key part of the workshop includes a roundtable to engage in a discussion on multidisciplinary, multi-agency responses among all participants and attendees. (venue tbc)

2) Poetic Responses to Contemporary Migration (17.00-20.00)

An evening of poetry on the theme of contemporary migration will be hosted at Keele as part of the AHRC-funded international project Responding to Crisis: Forced Migration and the Humanities in the Twenty-First Century. Readings by Saradha Soobrayen, Robert Hampson, David Herd, among others will engage the audience with the challenges of forced displacement. A selection of poems by Keele Creative writing students will also be presented along with an exhibition of photography and placement poetry. This will be hosted in the beautiful setting of Keele Hall. All participants are warmly invited to the wine and canapé reception after the readings. All welcome.

Sign up to both sessions or to one; all events are free, but numbers are limited. So, please make sure you let us know!

Further details can be found here.


The project Responding to Crisis, led by Mariangela Palladino (Keele) and Agnes Woolley (RHUL), aims to develop cultural responses to the current crisis. The arts and humanities have a vital role to play in shaping current debates on forced displacement – this is not only a crisis of geopolitics, but also of values. What role do the arts and humanities play in this critical context? How do we interpret, represent and conceptualise forced migration in the twenty-first century, and how do criticism and the arts play an active role in political transformation?

CFP: Narrating Emotions (EPSSE)

Narrating Emotions

April 21-22, 2017, University of Lucerne, Switzerland; European Philosophical Society for the Study of Emotions (EPSSE)

In the ongoing upsurge of studies on emotions the topic of narrativity has continuously been present. While some have claimed that emotions themselves have a narrative structure and thus need to be studied with the help of specifically narrative categories (David Velleman, Christiane Voss), others have suggested that narratives help us to understand or explain complex emotions such as shame, hatred or jealousy without the additional claim that such emotions have a narrative structure. Peter Goldie, in his late The Mess Inside (2012), emphasizes process emotions such as grief and treats them as inherently “narratable”. Others, such as Ronald De Sousa, propose that narratives or “paradigmatic scenarios” (often depicted in stories) help us to acquire familiarity with the meaning of emotions or claim that reading good literature will turn us into morally sensitive persons (Martha Nussbaum). Despite the great philosophical interest in all aspects of narrativity what is still lacking is a thoroughgoing philosophical appreciation of the results of narrativity research in the field of literary studies.

In the workshop we want to investigate the role of narratives or of models of narrativity in the field of emotion research and also attempt to connect the philosophical perspective to the perspective of narrativity research in literary studies. Typical questions to be investigated are: Are emotions narrative in structure? And if so: which emotions? Do we need narratives in order to understand or explain emotions? Does this understanding require specific narratives? Don’t we need a more refined understanding of narratives if we want to link emotion research to narrativity research? What can emotion research learn from novels or other fictional accounts and from their analysis in literary studies? Can narratives distort emotions?

The number of participants is limited. We invite submissions of abstracts (up to 500 words) and request a short academic CV. The workshop is under reserve of successful fundraising to be undertaken by the organizers.

Email submissions (and any questions) to Martin Hartmann.

Submission deadline: September 30, 2016

Organizers: Martin Hartmann (Lucerne), Eva Weber-Guskar (Göttingen)