Category Archives: Workshops

The BCLA At Home (SOAS)

THE BCLA AT HOME
Saturday, 18th November 2017
SOAS, University of London
Brunei Gallery – B 102

bcla_logo-png

From Thesis to Publication (12.00)Training session and discussion aimed especially at postgraduate students and early career academics, led by:

Dr Graham Nelson (Oxford ), Managing Editor of the Legenda (home to the BCLA’s own Studies in Comparative Literature, as well as Transcript and other interesting series).
Dr Richard Hibbitt (Leeds), Editor of the BCLA’s journal Comparative Critical Studies.
Prof Sanja Bahun (Essex), Associate Editor for Feminist Modernist Studies.
Prof Ben Hutchinson (Kent), Editor of Palgrave Studies in Modern European Literature.

Members of the BCLA Editorial Committee responsible for selecting publications for Studies in Comparative Literature will also be present and happy to answer questions.

Sandwich Lunch (1.30), featuring the Award of this year’s Arthur Terry Postgraduate Essay Prize

AGM & Open Meeting of the Executive Committee (2.15)

Wine Reception (5.00), featuring President Prof Susan Bassnett (Warwick) in conversation with Prof Matthew Reynolds (Oxford) and members of the BCLA

Please come and join us for this interesting and convivial day!

OCCT Hilary 2017

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation

 Hilary 2017 Events

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

Week 3 – “(Re)writing Fragments”: Reflections on Translating Poetry

Mon. 30 January 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Sarah Ekdawi (Oxford); Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford); Graduate Respondent: Spyros Karelas (Athens/Oxford); Chair: Eleni Philippou (Oxford)

Week 3 – Fiction and Other Minds: Modalities of Reading

Wed. 1 February 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Naomi Rokotnitz (Oxford); Renate Brosch (Stuttgart); Chair: Ben Morgan (Oxford)

Week 4 – “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

Thurs. 9 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death; Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford)

Week 5 – Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Wed. 15 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Nicky Harman; Chair: Kate Costello (Oxford)

(No knowledge of Chinese required, to register refer to OCCT website)

Week 6 – Translation as Afterlife

Wed. 22 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College

Speakers: Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan); Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Chair: Matthew Reynolds (Oxford)

Week 7: Writing an Academic Review

Wed. 1 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Marilyn Booth (Oxford); Chair: Dennis Duncan (Oxford)

Week 8: Online and Offline Forums for Cultural Production

Wed. 8 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: TBC

More details, including individual descriptions of each session, can be found here.

www.occt.ox.ac.uk; http://www.facebook.com/CompCritOxford; @OxfordCCT
Contact: comparative.criticism@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

Responding to Crisis – Workshop and Poetry Reading

Responding to Crisis: Forced Migration & the Humanities in the 21st Century, AHRC-funded project, Keele University, 5th October 2016

  1. Workshop: ‘Contemporary crisis of values and ‘necropolitics’ (12.00-16.00)

This  workshop consists of  5-10 minute presentations from speakers which include academics, practitioners, activists and artists (among which are Neelam Srivastava, Maggie O’Neill, Anthony Good, Roger Bromley, Jerome Phelps, Robert Hampson, Saradha Soobrayen, Carolina Albuerne).

Participants will illustrate the ways in which their current/recent work and activities engage with the deathly context of contemporary migration to Europe, which results in both literal and social deaths. As re-evaluations of humanism and humanitarianism continue, what role can/does the humanities play in discourses of forced migration? What methodologies do different sectors use to approach mass migration and displacement?

The overall aim of the workshop is to explore diverse approaches among activists, practitioners and academics to  the current ‘crisis’; hence, a key part of the workshop includes a roundtable to engage in a discussion on multidisciplinary, multi-agency responses among all participants and attendees. (venue tbc)

2) Poetic Responses to Contemporary Migration (17.00-20.00)

An evening of poetry on the theme of contemporary migration will be hosted at Keele as part of the AHRC-funded international project Responding to Crisis: Forced Migration and the Humanities in the Twenty-First Century. Readings by Saradha Soobrayen, Robert Hampson, David Herd, among others will engage the audience with the challenges of forced displacement. A selection of poems by Keele Creative writing students will also be presented along with an exhibition of photography and placement poetry. This will be hosted in the beautiful setting of Keele Hall. All participants are warmly invited to the wine and canapé reception after the readings. All welcome.

Sign up to both sessions or to one; all events are free, but numbers are limited. So, please make sure you let us know!

Further details can be found here.


The project Responding to Crisis, led by Mariangela Palladino (Keele) and Agnes Woolley (RHUL), aims to develop cultural responses to the current crisis. The arts and humanities have a vital role to play in shaping current debates on forced displacement – this is not only a crisis of geopolitics, but also of values. What role do the arts and humanities play in this critical context? How do we interpret, represent and conceptualise forced migration in the twenty-first century, and how do criticism and the arts play an active role in political transformation?

CFP: Narrating Emotions (EPSSE)

Narrating Emotions

April 21-22, 2017, University of Lucerne, Switzerland; European Philosophical Society for the Study of Emotions (EPSSE)

In the ongoing upsurge of studies on emotions the topic of narrativity has continuously been present. While some have claimed that emotions themselves have a narrative structure and thus need to be studied with the help of specifically narrative categories (David Velleman, Christiane Voss), others have suggested that narratives help us to understand or explain complex emotions such as shame, hatred or jealousy without the additional claim that such emotions have a narrative structure. Peter Goldie, in his late The Mess Inside (2012), emphasizes process emotions such as grief and treats them as inherently “narratable”. Others, such as Ronald De Sousa, propose that narratives or “paradigmatic scenarios” (often depicted in stories) help us to acquire familiarity with the meaning of emotions or claim that reading good literature will turn us into morally sensitive persons (Martha Nussbaum). Despite the great philosophical interest in all aspects of narrativity what is still lacking is a thoroughgoing philosophical appreciation of the results of narrativity research in the field of literary studies.

In the workshop we want to investigate the role of narratives or of models of narrativity in the field of emotion research and also attempt to connect the philosophical perspective to the perspective of narrativity research in literary studies. Typical questions to be investigated are: Are emotions narrative in structure? And if so: which emotions? Do we need narratives in order to understand or explain emotions? Does this understanding require specific narratives? Don’t we need a more refined understanding of narratives if we want to link emotion research to narrativity research? What can emotion research learn from novels or other fictional accounts and from their analysis in literary studies? Can narratives distort emotions?

The number of participants is limited. We invite submissions of abstracts (up to 500 words) and request a short academic CV. The workshop is under reserve of successful fundraising to be undertaken by the organizers.

Email submissions (and any questions) to Martin Hartmann.

Submission deadline: September 30, 2016

Organizers: Martin Hartmann (Lucerne), Eva Weber-Guskar (Göttingen)

Registration Open: Multilingual Locals and Significant Geographies before Colonialism

Multilingual Locals and Significant Geographies before Colonialism

16–18 June 2016, SOAS, University of London.

Registration is now open for the workshop “Multilingual Locals and Significant Geographies before Colonialism“, which will run 16–18 June 2016 at SOAS, University of London.

This is the first major event of the 5-year research project “Multilingual Locals and Significant Geographies: For a New Approach to World Literature“, funded by the European Research Council. This workshop seeks to map pre-colonial histories of local and transregional multilingualism in the Maghreb, north India, and Ethiopia. In the Maghreb this will include Berber in the North and the South, classical Arabic, French, Spanish and Judeo-Moroccan; in north India: Persian, Hindavi, Arabic and Sanskrit; in Ethiopia Ge’ez and any traces of oral and written traditions in the other languages present in the region. In the medieval period Ethiopian culture was well connected with religious centres of learning in the Mediterranean and Middle East.

The full programme, list of speakers and paper abstracts are available here. Please note that the deadline for registration is Friday 3 June. Please register at this link (a small fee is payable).

For more information about the workshop, please email the project administrator (temporary). To stay uptodate on the “Multilingual Locals” project, you can follow us on Twitter, or Facebook.