Category Archives: Workshops

OCCT: Oxford Translation Day, Trinity Events

Oxford Translation Day, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 3rd June 2017

OTD Poster

On June 3rd, St Anne’s College will be running Oxford Translation Day, a celebration of literary translation consisting of workshops and talks throughout the day at St Anne’s and around the city, culminating in the award of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. Oxford Translation Day is a joint venture of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize and Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (the research programme housed in St Anne’s and the Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities), in partnership with the Oxford German Network and Modern Poetry in Translation. All events are free and open to anyone, but registration is required. To register go to Eventbrite or see here: http://www.occt.ox.ac.uk

The programme can be found here.

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Week 4 – Poetic Currency Symposium (Collaboration with Stanford University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) Poetry Reading and Keynote Address. Wed. 18 May, 5:00 -7:30pm; Seminar Room 10 in the New Library, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Kristin Grogan (Oxford). Poets: Claire Trévien (UK); Tahel Frosh (Israel); Roy ‘Chicky’ Arad (Israel)

Week 4 – Poetic Currency SymposiumThurs. 19 May, 10:30 -16:30pm; Seminar Room 5, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Eleni Philippou (Oxford); Kasia Szymanska (Oxford); Idan Gillo (Stanford); Anat Weisman (BGU); Shira Stav (BGU); Roy Greenwald (BGU)

Week 5 – Fiction and Other Minds: Enacting Fictional SpaceWed. 24 May 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building. Speaker: Merja Polvinen (Helsinki); Respondent: Terence Cave (Oxford)

The OCCT 2017 Trinity programme can be found here – a detailed description of each individual event, here.

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness

Translate at City, University of London

Translate at City, Literary Translation in Practice, 26th – 30th June 2017, University of London

Are you a practising professional or a newcomer to the art of translation?

Develop your translation skills under the guidance of top professionals at a central London campus.

An immersion course in literary translation into English across genres – including selections from fiction, poetry, history, essays, journalism, travel and academic writing – taught by leading literary translators and senior academics, with plenty of opportunities for networking.

• Arabic – Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp

• Chinese – Nicky Harman

• French – Trista Selous and Frank Wynne

• German – Shaun Whiteside

• Italian – Howard Curtis

• Japanese – Angus Turvill

• Polish – Antonia Lloyd-Jones

• Portuguese – Daniel Hahn

• Russian – Robert Chandler

• Spanish – Peter Bush

• Swedish – Kevin Halliwell

Evening programme (attendance free): French Translation Slam with Frank Wynne and Ros Schwartz; Keynote Lecture Who Dares Wins by Professor Gabriel Josipovici; Author/translator Daniel Hahn on Translation and Children’s Books and a buffet supper at local gastro pub sponsored by Europe House with a talk by Paul Kaye, Europe House Languages Officer.

Full fee: £520. Bursaries available.

Directors Amanda Hopkinson (Visiting Professor in Literary

Translation, City, University of London) and French literary translator Ros Schwartz

Please note: All translation is into English and English needs to be your language of habitual use. All evening and lunchtime events are free and attendance is voluntary.

The organisers reserve the right to cancel a workshop that does not recruit to the required minimum number of participants. Any applicants for these groups will be notified with a minimum six weeks’ notice.

For more information, contact dina.leifer@city.ac.uk. Twitter: @Translate_City

BCLA Conference Support

If you are a member of the BCLA, you can apply for financial support (up to £300 per event) for conferences and workshops on comparative topics. To apply, please fill in the form and send it to the BCLA Conference Officer, Prof. Ben Hutchinson.

Recent events supported by the BCLA include:

– BCLA panel on Satire at the ICLA, Vienna, July 2016

– BCLA Graduate Reception: ‘Afterlives’, UCL,  November 2016

– BCLA and SELGyC joint session, Santander, November 2016

CFP: Creative Critical Writing Workshop, UCL

Creative Critical Writing Workshop for Graduate Students and Early Career Researchers, University College London, 28-30 June 2017

Submission deadline: 23 April 2017

Recent years have witnessed increasing interest in innovative ways of conducting and presenting research, what we here term Creative Critical Writing. Distinct from literary or fictional writing, Creative Critical Writing is a research method that treats the form of academic writing as constitutive of its conceptual argument. It draws inspiration from a tradition of thought that includes Plato’s dialogues, Montaigne’s Essais, Nietzsche’s aphorisms, Walter Benjamin’s Denkbilder, Jacques Derrida’s deconstructive play with language, and Hélène Cixous’s écriture féminine as well as more recent experiments with digital media, disruptive translation and various types of performative or site-specific writing.

In response to these developments, we want to foster a conversation between researchers with an interest in creative critical methodologies. Rather than a usual conference, we aim to organise a practice-based workshop that brings together established academics and young researchers from a wide range of disciplines. Together we will explore the creative aspects of our critical practices and develop imaginative responses to questions that we face in our work.

Creative Critical Writing is often reflected in publication formats that depart from the “standard” academic article, although it also has the potential to become a powerful tool for public engagement and outreach activities. Therefore the workshop will be followed by a public exhibition and a related publication in which the participants are given the chance to present their research in creative critical formats. The exhibition will take place at a central location on UCL’s campus in October 2017.

This call is aimed at graduate students and early career researchers of all disciplines with cultural and/or critical elements, including, but not limited to:

Anthropology

Architecture

Art

Classics

Cultural Studies

Digital Humanities

Environmental and/or Medical Humanities

History of Art

History of Science

Modern Languages

Musicology

Law

Literature

Philosophy

Psychology

Religious Studies

Translation Studies

If you are interested in taking part, please submit a brief outline of your current research that includes a few sentences on how your work relates to the workshop theme as well as a short bio (no more than a page in total).

Please email to CreativeCriticalWriting@gmail.com before 23rd April 2017. Selected participants will be notified in early May.

Participation is free and includes coffee, some lunch breaks, and a wine reception. We are unfortunately not able to offer contributions towards accommodation or travel expenses. For more information, please visit:

www.creativecriticalwriting.wordpress.com

Landscapes of Realism, SOAS

Landscapes of Realism: Workshop 5. ICLA Project (supported by the Leverhulme Trust Network Fund), 17 and 18 February 2017, S209 (Senate House, North Block), SOAS, University of London

Topic 1: Institutions and Ideologies of Realism: mapping out realist conventions; readership and expectations; canonization; production and circulation.

Topic 2: Cultural Encounters: (a) comparative study of how realist texts portray the other, the foreigner, stereotypes; and (b) the overlap and divergence between truth and reality in theories of knowledge and representation in non-European philosophical and critical traditions. How is Realism to be understood within a worldview that sees reality as illusion and its transcendence or abandonment as homecoming? What if experienced reality contradicts directly received divine truths? What then is real and how is it known and theorized? What impact do such worldviews have on the representation of what can be seen, heard, sensed, and comprehended, and on the development of non-European aesthetics and relevant literary theories? More crucially, what happens to the non-European theories and modes of representation when they encounter European Realism in the C19 and C20? How may non- European responses to Realism be explained within the broader context of imperialism, colonialism, resistance and revolution? How does Realism serve as both framework and foil for non- European interrogation of both Eastern and Western traditions of critical thought on the true and the real?

Workshop 1: Friday 17 February 2017

Institutions and Ideologies of Realism

10:00-10:15 Arrival tea & coffee

10:15-10:30 Welcome Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS) and Simon James (Durham)

10:30-12:00

Chair: Simon James (Durham)

Newspapers and their Beginnings: Fiction, Journalism, Realism

Edmund Birch (Churchill College, Cambridge)

‘A space of stunted grass and dry rubbish’: realism and ‘equal ground’

Simon Grimble

Women, Work, and Periodical Literature

Margaret Higonnet (University of Connecticut)

12:00-13:00 Sandwich lunch

13:00-15:00

Chair: Simon James (Durham)

Melodrama, Theatricality and Realism

Jeremy Tambling

Global Capitalism and the Novel

Bashir Abu-Manneh (Kent)

Literature and Education in the 1930s: Arthur Calder-Marshall and Winifred Holtby on Schools

Matthew Taunton (UEA)

Experimentation and Innovation in the Twentieth Century, Social Realist Short Story

Anthony Patterson

15:00-15:30 Break tea & coffee

Workshop 2 (a): Friday 17 February 2017

Cultural Encounters

15:30 to 17:00

Chair: Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS)

The Fictitiousness of Reality: Ḥussein Barghoutī’s Conception of Realism

Haneen Omari (Leiden University)

Respondent: Bashir Abu-Manneh (Kent)

Displaced Realisms: Machado de Assis in the 19th and 20th century

Paulo Lemos Horta (New York University Abu Dhabi)

Respondent

The Transmedia and Transcultural Hyperrealism of Ai Weiwei’s Digital Communication

Daria Berg and Giorgio Strafella (University of St.Gallen, Switzerland)

Respondent: Steen Bille Jorgenson

18:30 Workshop dinner

Workshop 2 (b) Saturday 18 February 2017

Cultural Encounters

10:00-10:30 Arrival tea & coffee

10:30-12:30

Chair: Alena Rettrova (SOAS)

Time and Space: A First Sketch

Svend Erik Larsen and Rosa Mucignant

What if experienced realty contradicts directly received divine truths?

Stephen Hart (UCL)

Realism at the Peripheries

Ulka Anjaria (Brandeis University)

Realism and Other

Midori Atkins (Independent Scholar)

12:30 -13:30 Sandwich lunch

13:30-15:00

Chair: Stephen Hart (UCL)

Russian idleness, European business: work and commerce in 19th-century Russian realism (Andrea Zink, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Cultural Determinism: The Emergence of the Statistical ‘Real’ in the 19th Century

Genie Babb (SUNY Plattsburgh)

The Colonial Gaze and its Critics in Nineteenth-Century German Realism

Dirk Göttsche (Nottingham)

Respondent: Alena Rettrova (SOAS)

End of Public Programme

15:00-15:30 Break tea & coffee

15:30 to 17:30 Business meeting (Network members only)

18:30 Workshop dinner

Abstracts can be found here.