Category Archives: Postgraduate Events

New MA program in Comparative Literature at UC Davis

The Department of Comparative Literature at UC Davis is pleased to announce the launch of a new two-year, thesis-based MA program. This freestanding M.A. program will prepare students for doctoral research or professional employment. The program combines core courses on the theory and practice of comparison with broad opportunities for work in specific languages and literatures. Students will write a Masters thesis with the support of a thesis committee and a collaborative thesis-writing group. The first round of applications will be due by 15 January 2018. For more information see here, or contact Stefan Uhlig at shuhlig@ucdavis.edu.

OCCT: Oxford Translation Day, Trinity Events

Oxford Translation Day, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 3rd June 2017

OTD Poster

On June 3rd, St Anne’s College will be running Oxford Translation Day, a celebration of literary translation consisting of workshops and talks throughout the day at St Anne’s and around the city, culminating in the award of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. Oxford Translation Day is a joint venture of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize and Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (the research programme housed in St Anne’s and the Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities), in partnership with the Oxford German Network and Modern Poetry in Translation. All events are free and open to anyone, but registration is required. To register go to Eventbrite or see here: http://www.occt.ox.ac.uk

The programme can be found here.

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Week 4 – Poetic Currency Symposium (Collaboration with Stanford University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) Poetry Reading and Keynote Address. Wed. 18 May, 5:00 -7:30pm; Seminar Room 10 in the New Library, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Kristin Grogan (Oxford). Poets: Claire Trévien (UK); Tahel Frosh (Israel); Roy ‘Chicky’ Arad (Israel)

Week 4 – Poetic Currency SymposiumThurs. 19 May, 10:30 -16:30pm; Seminar Room 5, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Eleni Philippou (Oxford); Kasia Szymanska (Oxford); Idan Gillo (Stanford); Anat Weisman (BGU); Shira Stav (BGU); Roy Greenwald (BGU)

Week 5 – Fiction and Other Minds: Enacting Fictional SpaceWed. 24 May 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building. Speaker: Merja Polvinen (Helsinki); Respondent: Terence Cave (Oxford)

The OCCT 2017 Trinity programme can be found here – a detailed description of each individual event, here.

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness

CFP: Authority, Memory, Transgression, Glasgow

Authority, Memory, Transgression: Trends in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies, Postgraduate Conference, May 5th 2017, the University of Glasgow

On Friday, May 5th 2017 the University of Glasgow is hosting an interdisciplinary postgraduate conference entitled Authority, Memory, Transgression: Trends in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies. This event follows on from the successful postgraduate conference held in Glasgow in 2015, and the aim is to provide a forum for discussion about new directions in both these expanding interdisciplines.

If you would like to offer a short paper ( 15 minutes) please send an abstract by April 15th to Susan.Bassnett@glasgow.ac.uk and to Michael.Syrotinski@glasgow.ac.uk.

There will also be a poster session – please indicate in your email if you would like to be considered for a poster display instead of a paper.

Invited speakers will include Professor Susan Bassnett (Glasgow), Professor Michael Cronin (Dublin City University), and Professor David Johnston (Queen’s University Belfast). Be as adventurous as you like: we want provocative discussions and some genuinely innovative thinking.

Click here for more information.

CFP: Endgame(s) – GLITS

Endgame(s), GLITS (Goldsmiths Literature Seminar) Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference, June 9th 2017, Goldsmiths, University of London

Plenary Speaker: Professor Ivan Callus, University of Malta

Website: www.endgames2017.co.uk

We live in perilous times. Institutional decay, declining living standards, the collapse of social welfare, and potentially the end of liberal democracy all afflict our contemporary historical moment. Looming ecological and migratory issues transcend the limits of what we think and feel to be possible, threatening us in ways we are unable to imagine, let alone rationalise. Yet, there is a profound sense that every epoch has its own ‘endgame’; that every society recognises itself as itself in the vision of its own future demise. Endgames consequently populate the historical record, from the Millenarianism of the medieval world and the fin de siècle culture of Mitteleuropa, to the historical ends that the mythologies of Fascism and Stalinism sought to bring about, to anxieties of nuclear holocaust and the Y2K millennium bug and – more recently – Brexit. It seems that the apocalypse, by definition, must be repeatable. In 1925 T.S. Eliot captured appositely the sense of resultant disaffection and numbness – even frustration – this engenders: ‘This is the way the world ends, Not with a bang but a whimper.’

However, living in the end-times can also be exhilarating, even liberating. A German expression encapsulates this hedonism: ‘Tanz auf dem Vulkan [dancing on the volcano]’. The end-times – different from the mere knowledge of our individual mortality – can trigger an ecstatic sense of being, perhaps even a means to bridge the intersubjective gaps that lie between us and forge new collective possibilities. Thus, leading us to the imagining of termination for positive affect; bringing current socio-economic and political systems to their [il]logical conclusions; repurposing technology for socially beneficial and emancipatory ends.

This conference seeks to explore the way in which literature and narrative cultures order and represent visions of the end of the world and how this constitutes a pervasive influence on philosophy, political theory and popular culture. We invite papers that discuss ways of thinking and feeling in the end times, those of the past, present and, inevitably, those endgames still to be played out in the future.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Literature of resistance, dissidence, change, from the middle-ages to 21st Century.
  • The end of literature and the contemporary novel.
  • Borders and limits in relation to migration, displacement, and refuge.
  • Apocalypse, catastrophe and revelation.
  • Climate-change, environmental disaster, and eco-criticism.
  • Corruption, decadence, degradation, decay.
  • Endgames and end-times in popular culture.
  • Epochality, historicity, temporality.
  • Technology and media.
  • Post-truth and Post-fact discourses.

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20 minute papers, short creative pieces, and readings, from all postgraduate students by Friday 31st March to be sent to the conference organisers David Cross and Marc Farrant at endgames2017@gold.ac.uk – Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words. Please include details of your current level of study and home institution. For creative readings, please send a short example of your work.

CFP: Women on the Verge, Uni. of Manchester

Women on the Verge, Transformations in Literature, Gender and Society, The University of Manchester, 16th June 2017

We are proud to announce Women on the Verge: Transformations in Literature, Gender and Society, the first of a planned series of one-day conferences aimed at PhD students and early career scholars from across the Humanities and beyond.

The conference aims to serve as an interdisciplinary forum for discussion, analysis and reflection on the concept of femininity and gender representations, which are socially, geographically and culturally embedded. Furthermore, it focuses on the re-appreciation of women as creative and professional figures within the literary environment and the cultural marketplace (artists, authors, publishers, editors, translators and so forth).

We welcome papers from, but not limited to, the fields of Literature, Translation, Interpreting and Intercultural Studies, Media and Film Studies, History, Book History and Cultural Studies, Gender Studies, Art History and Visual Culture.

Research topics may include:

– Processes of construction, re-construction and negotiation of women’s bodily and cultural identity.

– Constructions of female authorship and dynamics of gendered canonization and marginalisation in literary tradition.

– The influence of social and cultural structures on the role historically played by women in the literary and artistic field.

– The ‘social turn’ in Translation and Interpreting Studies, focusing on re-writing, re-translation and feminism, and the dynamics of gender and occupational segregation in the linguistic labour market.

– The use of translation as a means to assert, reflect and redefine a definition of female identities tied to cultural and geographical dimensions.

Please note, however, that proposals for papers addressing other themes are very welcome. Acceptance will be based on academic merit after a thorough review process.

The conference also invites contributions for a small photo exhibition to be held at The University of Manchester.

Abstract of approx. 250-300 words can be sent to wotvconf@gmail.com. The deadline for the submission abstracts is 15th March 2017. 

More information can be found here.