Category Archives: Publications of Interest

KCL Book Launch

Book Launch

6.30pm on Friday 9 December, Council Room, King’s College London

 – Ben Hutchinson, Lateness and Modern European Literature (OUP, 2016)

– Karen Leeder (ed.), Figuring Lateness in Modern German Culture, a special edition of New German Critique (2015)

– Gordon McMullan and Sam Smiles, Late Style and its Discontents (OUP, 2016)

Directions
The Council Room at King’s is in the original building that faces Somerset House looking west; from the Strand, it’s behind (i.e. south of) the Strand Building, which is the concrete block facing St Mary-le-Strand (the church in the middle of the road). You go through the Strand Building revolving doors and straight on through (walking south) to the King’s Building; then you go up the stone stairs to your left to the next level; head south again and the Council Room is on your right.

Translation: A Very Short Introduction by Matthew Reynolds

Translation: A Very Short Introduction by Matthew Reynolds

reynolds-image

Translation is everywhere, and matters to everybody. Translation doesn’t only give us foreign news, dubbed films and instructions for using the microwave: without it, there would be no world religions, and our literatures, our cultures, and our languages would be unrecognisable.

In this Very Short Introduction, Matthew Reynolds (BCLA Secretary) gives an authoritative and thought-provoking account of the field, from ancient Akkadian to World English, from St Jerome to Google Translate. He shows how translation determines meaning, how it matters in commerce, empire, conflict and resistance, and why it is fundamental to literature and the arts.

Read a blogpost about the book here, and for further details please follow this link.

MHRA Working Papers in the Humanities

The MHRA (Modern Humanities Research Association) is looking for a second postgraduate editor for its online journal, MHRA Working Papers in the Humanities. Working Papers was launched in 2006 and is aimed at early career researchers and postgraduates.

The successful applicant will serve as a second postgraduate representative to the MHRA Executive Committee, attending three committee meetings per year in London and advising on postgraduate matters. The position will also involve an element of conference organisation. For further information about the work of the MHRA.

This position starts in January 2017 and ends in December 2018. Whilst unpaid, it offers invaluable experience in the world of academic publishing, as well as representing a chance to work constructively for the future of the Humanities more broadly. Applications are welcome from postgraduates working in any of the ‘modern humanities’, defined as relating to the modern and medieval languages, literatures and cultures of Europe (including English and the Slavonic languages, and the cultures of the European diaspora).

Applicants should send a CV and cover letter (in a single Word file, please), together with a letter of support from their supervisor, as email attachments to Mrs Ann Keith, Assistant Secretary, by 5 December 2016. Informal enquiries are welcome and may be addressed to the current representative, Eleanor Dobson.

CFP: Critical Insights, Edith Wharton

Please see below the call for essays for a forthcoming volume on Edith Wharton. The volume is part of the series Critical Insights (Salem Press) and will appear in Fall 2017. More information can be found here.

Following the guidelines for the series, I seek essays (4000-5000 words) that are accessible to high school students and undergraduates, and are meant to:

 Provide undergraduates with a comprehensive introduction to the author’s works, as well as the various approaches students are likely to encounter and study in their classrooms.

 Help students build a foundation for studying works in greater depth by introducing them to key concepts, contexts, critical approaches, and vocabulary in literary scholarship.

The format of each volume is standard, and will include:

 A “biographical” essay (2000 words) that gives an overview of Wharton’s life

 A “historical background” essay (4000-5000 words) that addresses how the time period influenced Wharton as well as what makes her work relevant to a modern audience. The essay should consider a variety of contexts in which Wharton’s work is usually placed.

 A “critical reception” essay (4000-5000 words) that reviews the history of critical responses to Wharton’s oeuvre, and addresses the major concerns that scholars have identified over the years. The essay should be a comprehensive overview of criticism rather than a focused analysis of specific perspectives.

 A “critical lens” essay (4000-5000 words) that offers a close reading of Wharton’s work(s) from a particular critical standpoint (e.g. gender studies, cultural studies, disability studies, etc).

 A “comparative analysis” essay (4000-5000 words) that analyses Wharton in the light of another (similar or contemporary) author.

In addition: the volume will include ten 5000-word essays, which will offer various critical readings of Wharton’s work. Topics could address (but are not limited to):

 Wharton and the First World War; Wharton and race; Wharton and feminism; queer readings of Wharton’s works; Wharton and cosmopolitanism; Wharton and modernism; Wharton as an architectural historian; Wharton’s works in comparison with other writers (American or not); Wharton in a transatlantic context; Wharton and animal studies; Wharton and disability; Wharton and other genres (e.g. Gothic); Wharton in film; Wharton as a travel writer, etc.

I welcome topics that reflect the main critical approaches to Wharton’s oeuvre, as well as recent reevaluations of her work. Essays that incorporate a range of Wharton’s texts are strongly encouraged. Readings and approaches should not be dated nor so cutting-edge as to be dated in the next 10 years.

Please send an abstract (500-1000 words) and a brief CV by November 30, 2016 to:

Myrto Drizou, PhD, Department of English, Valdosta State University, Valdosta GA 31698, mdrizou@valdosta.edu

Notification of acceptance by December 15, 2016. Complete first drafts (5000 words) due by March 15, 2017.

CFP: Skepsi, ‘Borders’

Skepsi: Call for Articles, ‘Borders’

Skepsi is an online interdisciplinary peer reviewed research journal, now in its ninth year, run by postgraduate students of the University of Kent’s School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) and funded by the University of Kent.

Following the recent success of our interdisciplinary conference on ‘Borders’, held at the University of Kent in May 2016, we are calling for contributions on the same theme to a future issue of Skepsi to be published summer 2017.

Thor Heyerdahl, widely known for his Kon-Tiki expedition, is said to have once remarked, ‘Borders? I have never seen one, but I have heard that they exist in the mind of some people’. Arguably, Heyerdahl might be mistaken for questioning the existence of borders, yet his statement nonetheless draws attention to some highly interesting and controversial questions: What exactly are borders and on what necessary, legal and ethical grounds do we build them — and where? These questions seem particularly relevant today, as the European Union is facing the so-called migrant ‘crisis’, and with Daesh’s auto-proclamation of an Islamic State.

It is, thus, not surprising that academic interest in borders is on the increase. Over the last decades the topic has been developing into a new interdisciplinary field of research drawing together scholars from the social sciences and humanities. Border studies notably look at the historical, anthropological, sociological, and geopolitical aspects of borders ‘in the quest to understand the changing nature of territory, power, governance, and identity within both national and more global frames of reference’ (Wilson & Donnan: 20–21).

Topics may include but are not limited to:

 European Borders and the Refugee Crisis

 Shifting Borders, Territory and Partition

 The Frontier

 Security and Conflict

 Globalisation vs. National State

 Colonialism and New Imperialism

 Mobility, Migration and Multicultural Societies

 Borders and (national/sexual/racial) Identity

 Performativity

 Crossing Borders

 The Impact of Borders on Literature and their Literary Representation

 The Representation of Borders in the Arts

 Borders and Language(s)

 Physical Boundaries and the Self

 Psychological Aspects of Borders and Boundaries

Submissions are invited from academic staff, postgraduate students and independent scholars. Articles will be selected by the Board after peer review and published in a forthcoming issue of the journal, to be published in summer 2017.

Articles, which should not exceed 6,000 words, should be sent together with an abstract of about 250 words and brief biographical details about the author to: skepsi@kent.ac.uk

The deadline for submission is 31 October 2016.

Skepsi is an online interdisciplinary peer reviewed research journal, now in its ninth year, run by postgraduate students of the University of Kent’s School of European Culture and Languages and funded by the University of Kent.

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Skepsi Call for Peer Reviewers

Skepsi is currently looking for peer reviewers in the fields of the humanities and the social sciences.

All of the articles submitted to Skepsi are double-blind peer reviewed (the peer review will be blind both for the author and the peer-reviewer). Peer reviewers read and give anonymous feedback on the style, presentation, originality, scholarly merits, of the academic articles in their field of study.

The peer reviewing system guarantees the quality and the originality of the material published in the journal.

For more details on becoming a peer reviewer, please see the page here.