Category Archives: Translations

CFP: Inverbis – Translating the Margin

Inverbis Special Issue (2018) Translating the margin: Lost voices in the aesthetic discourse

Guest Editors: Alessandra Rizzo (University of Palermo) and Karen Seago (City, University of London)
Copy-editor: Maila Enea (University of Roehampton)

This special issue aims at investigating and presenting concrete examples of translation as a linguistic and cultural expedient that reveals migrant and refugee experiences as counternarratives. The objective is to demonstrate, on the one hand, how translation is involved in the production and dissemination of counter-narratives aiming at the re-telling of experiences of displacement as a result of conflict, persecution, and famine. And, on the other hand, how the migrant presence in the receiving country acts as a stimulus to the creation of an international network of filmmakers, musicians, artists and activists who are capturing and responding to individual stories of struggle and success in the migrant and refugee communities.

 

More information is available here.

Tamim Al-Barghouti: Book launch, Workshop, Public Event (SOAS)

 

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The Poet of Jerusalem is coming to SOAS. Tamim Al-Barghouti, one of the most important and popular Arab poets of his generation, is launching the first English translation of his poetry on. The poemsin In Jerusalem and Other Poems, lovingly translated by his late mother, Radwa Ashour, the prominent Egyptian academic and novelist, and Ahdaf Soueif, the Booker nominated author of The Map of Love, were written in Cairo, Ramallah, Amman, Washington, DC and Berlin between 1996 and 2016. In 2007, Al-Barghouti’s long poem “In Jerusalem,” which describes an aborted journey to the city, became something of a street poem. It is heartbreakingly beautiful. It speaks to the story of millions of homeless Palestinians who have been forced to live in exile since 1948. His father, the famous writer Mourid Barghouti, was expelled from Egypt, where Tamim was born, when he was only five months old. Tamim lived with his mother in Cairo, and for 18 years only saw his father in Budapest during winter and summer vacations. But his poetry is more than the sum total of the Palestinian experience. It is also the barometer of the political fortunes in the Arab world, from the American invasion of Iraq in 2003, the Arab Spring spreading like fire from Tunisia in 2010, and the 26 January 2011 Revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak and transformed an entire generation. Above all, it is testament to a resilient Arabic poetic tradition that, at the hands of a young talent, can continue to thrive, generate new energy and move hearts and souls.

Tamim returns to SOAS on Tuesday, 27 June 2017, to take part in the Chase-funded Arabic Poetry and Stories Translation Workshop (SOAS, S118, 2:30 to 5:30PM) and public event (SOAS, KLT, 6:30-8:00 PM), convened by Marina Warner (Birckbeck) and Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS), as part of ‘It was and it was not…’: Translation in Action Programme.

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Tamim Al-Barghouti is an acclaimed Palestinian poet, columnist and political scientist. His poetry readings are attended by thousands, sometimes packing stadiums and amphitheaters. Born in Cairo in 1977, Al-Barghouti published six poetry collections in both colloquial and classical Arabic including  Meejana (Ramallah 1999), Al-Manzar “The Scene” (Cairo 2000), Maqam Iraq (Cairo: 2005) and Fil Quds “In Jersualem” (2008), and two  academic books on Arab politics and history:  Benign Nationalism (Cairo: 2007) and The Umma and The Dawla: The Nation State and the Arab Middle East  (London: 2008). He is also the author of “War, Peace, Civil War: a Pattern?” in Palestine and the Palestinians in the 21st century (Bloomington: 2013) and “Cracking Cauldrons” in Shifting Sands: the Unraveling of the Old Order in the Middle East (London: 2015). He received his PhD in political science in 2004, and has since taught at Georgetown University, the Free University in Berlin, and the American University in Cairo. He was also a fellow at the Berlin Institute for Advanced studies 2007-2008.  A columnist since 2003, writing in Egyptian and dailies, Al-Barghouti has been associated with the 2011 uprisings, where recordings of his poetry were broadcast on makeshift screens in Egypt’s Tahrir Square during the 18 days of demonstrations that ousted Hosny Mubarak.

John Dryden Translation Competition Winners 2016-2017

The winners of the John Dryden Translation Competition for 2016-2017 have been announced. The jury has evaluated translations from a range of languages into English and awarded the following:

First prize: Melody Shaw for The Swifts’ Nest from the German of Christoph Poschenrieder’s Mauersegler

Second prize: Robert Cantrick for Mario and the Magician from the German of Thomas Mann’s Mario und der Zauberer

Third prize: Clare Beddows for The Shadow of the Staff from the Italian of Mauro Corona’s L’Ombra del Bastone

Commendation: Simon Bruni for Cinnamon from the Spanish of Paul Pen’s Canela

See the previous winners of the John Dryden Translation Competition.

If you would like to enter the 2017-2018 competition, conditions of entry and further information can be found on the John Dryden Translation Competition 2017-2018 Entry Form. Entries will be received from September 2017, and the deadline for submissions is 12 February 2018.

Encounter with Cristina Fernández Cubas, Nottingham

Encounter with Cristina Fernández Cubas, University of Nottingham, 2nd June 2017

Cristina Fernández Cubas is one of the most accomplished contemporary writers of the fantastic in Spain and winner of the Premio Nacional de Narrativa in 2016. Join us in this event to discuss her work and the recent English translation of La habitación de Nona.

Translation workshop with Margaret Jull Costa, 2pm-3pm, Location: Trent C40. Limited spaces. By invitation only.

Literary round table: La habitación de Nona (Nona’s Room),4pm – 5pm. Location: Hemsley B2. With Cristina Fernández Cubas (Premio Nacional de Narrativa, 2016) and translators Kathryn Phillips-Miles and Simon Deefholts. Discussion in Spanish and English followed by a wine reception. All welcome but please register on Eventbrite.

This event is part of the research project Gender and the Fantastic in Hispanic Studies supported by the British Academy. Other sponsors: Grupo de Estudios sobre lo Fantástico, Grupo de Estudios Multitextuales de lo Insólito y Perspectivas de Género, BETA: Asociación de Jóvenes Doctores en Hispanismo.

Invited translators:

Margaret Jull Costa has been a literary translator for over 30 years and has translated works by novelists such as Eça de Queiroz, José Saramago, Javier Marías and Teolinda Gersão, as well as poets such as Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen and Ana Luísa Amaral. She has won various prizes, most recently the 2017 Best Translation Book Award for her co-translation with Robin Patterson of Lúcio Cardoso’s novel Chronicle of the Murdered House.. In 2013 she was invited to become a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and in 2014 was awarded an OBE for services to literature. In 2015 she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Leeds.She is currently Honorary Professor in Translation Studies at the University of Nottingham.

Kathryn Phillips-Miles and Simon Deefholts both studied Romance Languages and Literature at University College of Wales, Aberystwyth and later at Birkbeck College, University of London. They have enjoyed varied careers including teaching, translation, lexicography and finance, and have spent several years living and working in Spain. They have jointly translated a number of plays for the Spanish Theatre Festival of London as well as the three works comprising the Spanish Season in Peter Owen Publishers’ World Series of literature in translation: Nona’s Room by Cristina Fernández Cubas, Wolf Moon by by Julio Llamazares and Inventing Love by José Ovejero.

Translation as a creative practice, Roehampton

Translation as a creative practice in contexts of crisis

Friday, 26 May 2017, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Europe House, 32 Smith Square, London SW1P 3EU

Synopsis

This one-day event will explore how translation is used as a creative and artistic tool in order to cope with situations of crisis. The past years have witnessed extensive social and political unrest, economic turmoil and mass migration, giving rise to collective experiences of conflict and dislocation, and sometimes empowerment and emancipation, that have affected the lives of millions. These experiences are often recounted against the normative background of English as lingua franca using the dynamic of translation in various formats, such as interviews, narratives, cultural texts and visuals, video diaries and blogs. In these non-fictional texts, translation transcends its representational function, incorporating creative and politically meaningful practices of re-narration, re-enactment, self-translation, adaptation and intercultural communication, often in the form of digital and audiovisual media. Whether prompted by a need to articulate subjective experience in dominant idioms, to advocate new causes on international platforms, or to develop new media and art forms that challenge given orders of cultural transmission and exchange, translation is increasingly present in affective, pro-active and/or critical responses to situations of crisis.

 

This event will bring together: i) artists, filmmakers and journalists who have performed or used translation as a creative practice in their work; ii) professional and/or non-professional translators whose work relates to contexts of crisis; iii) academics who are studying creative uses of translation in socially/politically engaged contexts.

 

Participants

  • Paul Antick (photographer and lecturer, Roehampton): ‘Crisis’. From field to field
  • Irene Artegiani (translator and researcher, Roehampton) and Matteo Saltalippi (filmmaker and researcher, Goldsmiths): Crisis of a translation: When Germans become Krauts
  • Dimitris Asimakoulas (lecturer and researcher, Surrey): Comic heroes in Aristophanic graphic novels: Translating war and the battle of the poets
  • Davide Camarrone (journalist and writer): Literatures migrate. The migration of the literary text
  • Sue Clayton (filmmaker, Professor of film and television, Goldsmiths): “I am in Belgium and I am tired of God”: Texts, films and translation in work with Calais unaccompanied minors
  • Kumiko Kiuchi (translator and lecturer, Tokyo Institute of Technology): Ask not “do you belong to this landscape?” but “does this landscape belong to you?” Patrick Keiller’s Robinson trilogy in translation
  • Kevin McElvaney (photographer): #RefugeeCameras: Trying to see the individual behind the anonymous concept of a ‘refugee’?
  • Alessandra Rizzo (lecturer and researcher, Palermo): “Translation as re-narration” in the visual arts: Adaptation and performance in Queens of Syria and Odisseo Arriving Alone.

Organisers: Dionysios Kapsaskis and Alessandra Rizzo, Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, University of Roehampton; European Commission Representation in the UK.

Register for this event via Eventbrite.