Category Archives: Translations

OCCT Hilary 2017

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation

 Hilary 2017 Events

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

Week 3 – “(Re)writing Fragments”: Reflections on Translating Poetry

Mon. 30 January 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Sarah Ekdawi (Oxford); Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford); Graduate Respondent: Spyros Karelas (Athens/Oxford); Chair: Eleni Philippou (Oxford)

Week 3 – Fiction and Other Minds: Modalities of Reading

Wed. 1 February 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Naomi Rokotnitz (Oxford); Renate Brosch (Stuttgart); Chair: Ben Morgan (Oxford)

Week 4 – “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

Thurs. 9 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death; Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford)

Week 5 – Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Wed. 15 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Nicky Harman; Chair: Kate Costello (Oxford)

(No knowledge of Chinese required, to register refer to OCCT website)

Week 6 – Translation as Afterlife

Wed. 22 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College

Speakers: Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan); Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Chair: Matthew Reynolds (Oxford)

Week 7: Writing an Academic Review

Wed. 1 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Marilyn Booth (Oxford); Chair: Dennis Duncan (Oxford)

Week 8: Online and Offline Forums for Cultural Production

Wed. 8 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: TBC

More details, including individual descriptions of each session, can be found here.

www.occt.ox.ac.uk; http://www.facebook.com/CompCritOxford; @OxfordCCT
Contact: comparative.criticism@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

Translation: A Very Short Introduction by Matthew Reynolds

Translation: A Very Short Introduction by Matthew Reynolds

reynolds-image

Translation is everywhere, and matters to everybody. Translation doesn’t only give us foreign news, dubbed films and instructions for using the microwave: without it, there would be no world religions, and our literatures, our cultures, and our languages would be unrecognisable.

In this Very Short Introduction, Matthew Reynolds (BCLA Secretary) gives an authoritative and thought-provoking account of the field, from ancient Akkadian to World English, from St Jerome to Google Translate. He shows how translation determines meaning, how it matters in commerce, empire, conflict and resistance, and why it is fundamental to literature and the arts.

Read a blogpost about the book here, and for further details please follow this link.

BCLA – John Dryden Translation Competition

British Comparative Literature Association

The John Dryden Translation Competition

 Annual competition with February closing date; enter at any time of year

 Any genre

 Any language into English

 A maximum of 20 pages

 One entry £7; two entries £12; three entries £16

 First Prize £350; Second Prize £200; Third Prize £100

Full details and entry form can be found on the competition website. All entries received will go forward to the competition at the next closing date. Use the form provided on the website even if the current deadline has passed.

Entries are submitted in electronic and in hard copy format to:

Dr Karen Seago, John Dryden Translation Competition, Centre for English, Department of Journalism, School of Arts and Social Sciences, City, University of London, London – EC1V 0HB. Email: Translation@city.ac.uk. www.city.ac.uk/translation

The Oxford–Weidenfeld Prize: Shortlist Announcement

The Oxford–Weidenfeld Prize is for book-length literary translations into English from any living European language. It aims to honour the craft of translation, and to recognise its cultural importance.  It is funded by Lord Weidenfeld and by New College, The Queen’s College and St Anne’s College, Oxford. See its website for further details.

The winner will be announced at the prizegiving and dinner at St Anne’s College, Oxford on Saturday 11 June. Shortlisted translators have been invited to introduce their work, and read extracts. This will be the crowning event of Oxford Translation Day, which boasts a varied programme of talks, workshops and readings. Details are available at here.

This year’s judges of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize are the academics and writers Valentina Gosetti, Jonathan Katz, Graham Nelson, and Patrick McGuinness (Chair).

The 2016 shortlist is:

Paul Vincent and John Irons for 100 Dutch-Language Poems (Holland Park Press)
John Cullen for Kamel Daoud’s The Meursault Investigation (Oneworld)
Stephen Pearl  for Ivan Goncharov’s  The Same Old Story (Alma Classics)
Don Bartlett  for Karl Ove Knausgaard’s Dancing in the Dark: My Struggle (Harvill Secker)
Shaun Whiteside for  Charles Lewinsky’s Melnitz (Atlantic Books)
Lola M. Rogers  for Sofi Oksanen’s When the Doves Disappeared (Atlantic Books)
Philip Roughton for Jón Kalman Stefánsson’s The Heart of Man (MacLehose Press)
Lisa C. Hayden for Eugene Vodolazkin’s Laurus (Oneworld)

Oxford Translation Day

Oxford Translation Day

St Anne’s College, Oxford

11th June, 2016

Oxford Translation Day Poster 2016

On June 11th, St Anne’s College will be running Oxford Translation Day, a celebration of literary translation consisting of workshops and talks throughout the day at St Anne’s and around the city, culminating in the award of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. Our programme includes a range of events which are all open to the public, providing students, translators, publishers, writers, and anyone interested in languages with the opportunity to discover and discuss literary translation.

All events are free and open to anyone, but registration is required. Please see the website for our full programme and registration info.