Category Archives: Translations

CFP: Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

16th-17th June 2017

University of Oxford, St Hilda’s College/ Faculty of Classics

Keynote speakers:

Carole-Anne Upton (Middlesex University London)

Margherita Laera (University of Kent)

Lorna Hardwick (The Open University)

Liliane Campos (Université Paris Sorbonne-Nouvelle)

The poetics of theatre translation and adaptation is often dependent on the intimate knowledge of the expectations of the target audience. Understanding the evolution of theatre translations, the success or failure of some productions or texts requires a full understanding of the social context, and should therefore not be limited to a textual study alone.

In our current world, where individual countries are becoming more and more multicultural within themselves, understanding the societal implications of cultural exchanges becomes ever more complex and fundamental. Although one tends to rely primarily on the social sciences to reflect on society thanks to their quantitative and empirical investigations, the aim of this conference is to show that the theory and practice of theatre translation can significantly benefit our understanding.

In turn, we hope to see how the field of theatre translation can benefit from the methodologies of social sciences. In recent decades, the concepts and methodologies of theatre translation have recurrently been questioned. For instance, the popular terms ‘performability’ and ‘speakability’, conveniently used to describe a poetics of reception and often criticised for their lack of theoretical framework, could be conceptualised further in light of these new tools.

Focus of scholarship on theatre translation has recently departed from the European-American sphere and developed a welcome extension into new geographical spaces. It is, therefore, all the more necessary to incorporate an input from the social sciences (anthropology, ethnography, sociology, history, politics, international relations etc.) into the discussion.

A particular focus will be given to stage performance, from the point of view of both the performers and the audience. Because performances tend to be historically and culturally-rooted, translations in performance bring practical insights into the target society. The recent thriving interest in performance of Latin and Greek plays, which obeyed radically different cultural codes to ours, could be of particular relevance to this conference.

Proposals from across humanities and social sciences are welcome. Papers should be 20 minutes long, and potential speakers are very welcome to propose a case study which may be open to new possible theorisations in the field of Translation Studies. They may want to consider the following themes, but need not treat the list as prescriptive or final:

Links between theatre translations/adaptations and shaping identities as a social group

          Relevance of quantitative research and theatre translation

          Lines of connections between theatre anthropology and theatre translation

          Translating ideology and political resonances

          Theatre translation as a political/social engagement

          Theatre translation and the history and theory of international relations

          Staging intercultural translations

          Rehearsal ethnography

          Theatre translation and sociolinguistics

          Multilingualism

          Theatre translation and comparative cultural studies

          Theatre translation and modern economics

          Theatre translation in history

          Cultural/social determinism in theatre translation

          Promotion of endangered cultures/social minorities through theatre translations

Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biography to
oxfordtheatretranslation@gmail.com before the 9th April 2017.

The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation

Warwick launches cash prize to help transform translation into English

The University of Warwick is launching The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation, which will be awarded for the first time in November 2017.

The prize aims to address the gender imbalance in translated literature and to increase the number of international women’s voices accessible by a British and Irish readership.

Quote from Professor Maureen Freely, Head of English and Comparative Literary Studies and President of English PEN: “We’ve come a long way with the championing of world literature over the past decade, welcoming in a multiplicity of voices which have gone on to enrich us all. In the same period, however, we’ve noticed that it is markedly more difficult for women to make it into English translation. This prize offers us an opportunity to welcome in the voices and perspectives that we have missed thus far.”

A recent report by Nielsen Book showed that translated literary fiction makes up only 3.5% of the literary fiction titles published in the UK, but accounts for 7% of the volume of sales. If translated literature as a whole is underrepresented on the British book market, then women’s voices in translation are even more peripheral. The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, for example, was awarded 21 times, but was won by a woman only twice.

The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation will be awarded annually to the best eligible work of fiction, poetry, literary non-fiction or work of fiction for children or young adults written by a woman and translated into English by a female or male translator.

The prize money of £1000 will be split equally between the female writer and her translator(s). Publishers are invited to submit titles from April 3, 2017. The shortlist will be announced in October and the winner will be announced in November.

Quote from Professor Emeritus Susan Bassnett: “This prize is a rallying call to translators and publishers everywhere. There are dozens of fine women writers waiting to be translated – so let’s see more of them in our bookshops.”

Quote from Chantal Wright, Associate Professor of Translation as a Literary Practice, who is coordinating the prize: “This initiative would not have come about without the efforts of the wider literary translation community. Their efforts in raising awareness of the gender imbalance in translated literature were instrumental in the creation of the prize.”

The judges:

  • Boyd Tonkin, Senior Writer and columnist at The Independent
  • Susan Bassnett, Emeritus Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Warwick
  • Amanda Hopkinson, literary translator and scholar

Three years in the making, The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation is the product of a collaboration between the School of Modern Languages and Cultures and the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick and is sponsored through the university’s Connecting Cultures Global Research Priority. Warwick offers two Masters programmes and a PhD in translation, in addition to a variety of translation modules at the undergraduate level.

More information can be found here.

OCCT Hilary 2017

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation

 Hilary 2017 Events

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

Week 3 – “(Re)writing Fragments”: Reflections on Translating Poetry

Mon. 30 January 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Sarah Ekdawi (Oxford); Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford); Graduate Respondent: Spyros Karelas (Athens/Oxford); Chair: Eleni Philippou (Oxford)

Week 3 – Fiction and Other Minds: Modalities of Reading

Wed. 1 February 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Naomi Rokotnitz (Oxford); Renate Brosch (Stuttgart); Chair: Ben Morgan (Oxford)

Week 4 – “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

Thurs. 9 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death; Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford)

Week 5 – Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Wed. 15 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Nicky Harman; Chair: Kate Costello (Oxford)

(No knowledge of Chinese required, to register refer to OCCT website)

Week 6 – Translation as Afterlife

Wed. 22 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College

Speakers: Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan); Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Chair: Matthew Reynolds (Oxford)

Week 7: Writing an Academic Review

Wed. 1 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Marilyn Booth (Oxford); Chair: Dennis Duncan (Oxford)

Week 8: Online and Offline Forums for Cultural Production

Wed. 8 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: TBC

More details, including individual descriptions of each session, can be found here.

www.occt.ox.ac.uk; http://www.facebook.com/CompCritOxford; @OxfordCCT
Contact: comparative.criticism@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

Translation: A Very Short Introduction by Matthew Reynolds

Translation: A Very Short Introduction by Matthew Reynolds

reynolds-image

Translation is everywhere, and matters to everybody. Translation doesn’t only give us foreign news, dubbed films and instructions for using the microwave: without it, there would be no world religions, and our literatures, our cultures, and our languages would be unrecognisable.

In this Very Short Introduction, Matthew Reynolds (BCLA Secretary) gives an authoritative and thought-provoking account of the field, from ancient Akkadian to World English, from St Jerome to Google Translate. He shows how translation determines meaning, how it matters in commerce, empire, conflict and resistance, and why it is fundamental to literature and the arts.

Read a blogpost about the book here, and for further details please follow this link.

BCLA – John Dryden Translation Competition

British Comparative Literature Association

The John Dryden Translation Competition

 Annual competition with February closing date; enter at any time of year

 Any genre

 Any language into English

 A maximum of 20 pages

 One entry £7; two entries £12; three entries £16

 First Prize £350; Second Prize £200; Third Prize £100

Full details and entry form can be found on the competition website. All entries received will go forward to the competition at the next closing date. Use the form provided on the website even if the current deadline has passed.

Entries are submitted in electronic and in hard copy format to:

Dr Karen Seago, John Dryden Translation Competition, Centre for English, Department of Journalism, School of Arts and Social Sciences, City, University of London, London – EC1V 0HB. Email: Translation@city.ac.uk. www.city.ac.uk/translation