Category Archives: Translations

Translation as a creative practice, Roehampton

Translation as a creative practice in contexts of crisis

Friday, 26 May 2017, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Europe House, 32 Smith Square, London SW1P 3EU

Synopsis

This one-day event will explore how translation is used as a creative and artistic tool in order to cope with situations of crisis. The past years have witnessed extensive social and political unrest, economic turmoil and mass migration, giving rise to collective experiences of conflict and dislocation, and sometimes empowerment and emancipation, that have affected the lives of millions. These experiences are often recounted against the normative background of English as lingua franca using the dynamic of translation in various formats, such as interviews, narratives, cultural texts and visuals, video diaries and blogs. In these non-fictional texts, translation transcends its representational function, incorporating creative and politically meaningful practices of re-narration, re-enactment, self-translation, adaptation and intercultural communication, often in the form of digital and audiovisual media. Whether prompted by a need to articulate subjective experience in dominant idioms, to advocate new causes on international platforms, or to develop new media and art forms that challenge given orders of cultural transmission and exchange, translation is increasingly present in affective, pro-active and/or critical responses to situations of crisis.

 

This event will bring together: i) artists, filmmakers and journalists who have performed or used translation as a creative practice in their work; ii) professional and/or non-professional translators whose work relates to contexts of crisis; iii) academics who are studying creative uses of translation in socially/politically engaged contexts.

 

Participants

  • Paul Antick (photographer and lecturer, Roehampton): ‘Crisis’. From field to field
  • Irene Artegiani (translator and researcher, Roehampton) and Matteo Saltalippi (filmmaker and researcher, Goldsmiths): Crisis of a translation: When Germans become Krauts
  • Dimitris Asimakoulas (lecturer and researcher, Surrey): Comic heroes in Aristophanic graphic novels: Translating war and the battle of the poets
  • Davide Camarrone (journalist and writer): Literatures migrate. The migration of the literary text
  • Sue Clayton (filmmaker, Professor of film and television, Goldsmiths): “I am in Belgium and I am tired of God”: Texts, films and translation in work with Calais unaccompanied minors
  • Kumiko Kiuchi (translator and lecturer, Tokyo Institute of Technology): Ask not “do you belong to this landscape?” but “does this landscape belong to you?” Patrick Keiller’s Robinson trilogy in translation
  • Kevin McElvaney (photographer): #RefugeeCameras: Trying to see the individual behind the anonymous concept of a ‘refugee’?
  • Alessandra Rizzo (lecturer and researcher, Palermo): “Translation as re-narration” in the visual arts: Adaptation and performance in Queens of Syria and Odisseo Arriving Alone.

Organisers: Dionysios Kapsaskis and Alessandra Rizzo, Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, University of Roehampton; European Commission Representation in the UK.

Register for this event via Eventbrite.

OCCT: Oxford Translation Day, Trinity Events

Oxford Translation Day, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 3rd June 2017

OTD Poster

On June 3rd, St Anne’s College will be running Oxford Translation Day, a celebration of literary translation consisting of workshops and talks throughout the day at St Anne’s and around the city, culminating in the award of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. Oxford Translation Day is a joint venture of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize and Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (the research programme housed in St Anne’s and the Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities), in partnership with the Oxford German Network and Modern Poetry in Translation. All events are free and open to anyone, but registration is required. To register go to Eventbrite or see here: http://www.occt.ox.ac.uk

The programme can be found here.

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Week 4 – Poetic Currency Symposium (Collaboration with Stanford University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) Poetry Reading and Keynote Address. Wed. 18 May, 5:00 -7:30pm; Seminar Room 10 in the New Library, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Kristin Grogan (Oxford). Poets: Claire Trévien (UK); Tahel Frosh (Israel); Roy ‘Chicky’ Arad (Israel)

Week 4 – Poetic Currency SymposiumThurs. 19 May, 10:30 -16:30pm; Seminar Room 5, St Anne’s College. Speakers: Eleni Philippou (Oxford); Kasia Szymanska (Oxford); Idan Gillo (Stanford); Anat Weisman (BGU); Shira Stav (BGU); Roy Greenwald (BGU)

Week 5 – Fiction and Other Minds: Enacting Fictional SpaceWed. 24 May 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building. Speaker: Merja Polvinen (Helsinki); Respondent: Terence Cave (Oxford)

The OCCT 2017 Trinity programme can be found here – a detailed description of each individual event, here.

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness

The Translator Made Corporeal, British Library

Please join us at the one-day conference “The Translator Made Corporeal: Translation History and the Archive” at the British Library on Monday, May 8, 2017.

Keynote speaker: Prof. Jeremy Munday (Leeds). Final panel chaired by Prof. Theo Hermans (UCL). Panelists: Outi Paloposki, Robert Looby, Richard Mansell and others TBA.

Lunch hour exhibition: The Translator Made Corporeal: Through the Lens. Photographic portraits of translators taken at the 2017 London Book Fair by Julia Schönstädt.

For more information, including a detailed programme and ticket booking (concession available) please go to our event website.

You can also find us on social media:

Facebook

Twitter: (@translator_2017)

Conference hashtag: #translatorcorporeal

We look forward to seeing you!

On behalf of the The Translator Made Corporeal team,

Marlies Gabriele Prinzl, UCL

Translate at City, University of London

Translate at City, Literary Translation in Practice, 26th – 30th June 2017, University of London

Are you a practising professional or a newcomer to the art of translation?

Develop your translation skills under the guidance of top professionals at a central London campus.

An immersion course in literary translation into English across genres – including selections from fiction, poetry, history, essays, journalism, travel and academic writing – taught by leading literary translators and senior academics, with plenty of opportunities for networking.

• Arabic – Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp

• Chinese – Nicky Harman

• French – Trista Selous and Frank Wynne

• German – Shaun Whiteside

• Italian – Howard Curtis

• Japanese – Angus Turvill

• Polish – Antonia Lloyd-Jones

• Portuguese – Daniel Hahn

• Russian – Robert Chandler

• Spanish – Peter Bush

• Swedish – Kevin Halliwell

Evening programme (attendance free): French Translation Slam with Frank Wynne and Ros Schwartz; Keynote Lecture Who Dares Wins by Professor Gabriel Josipovici; Author/translator Daniel Hahn on Translation and Children’s Books and a buffet supper at local gastro pub sponsored by Europe House with a talk by Paul Kaye, Europe House Languages Officer.

Full fee: £520. Bursaries available.

Directors Amanda Hopkinson (Visiting Professor in Literary

Translation, City, University of London) and French literary translator Ros Schwartz

Please note: All translation is into English and English needs to be your language of habitual use. All evening and lunchtime events are free and attendance is voluntary.

The organisers reserve the right to cancel a workshop that does not recruit to the required minimum number of participants. Any applicants for these groups will be notified with a minimum six weeks’ notice.

For more information, contact dina.leifer@city.ac.uk. Twitter: @Translate_City

CFP: Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

16th-17th June 2017

University of Oxford, St Hilda’s College/ Faculty of Classics

Keynote speakers:

Carole-Anne Upton (Middlesex University London)

Margherita Laera (University of Kent)

Lorna Hardwick (The Open University)

Liliane Campos (Université Paris Sorbonne-Nouvelle)

The poetics of theatre translation and adaptation is often dependent on the intimate knowledge of the expectations of the target audience. Understanding the evolution of theatre translations, the success or failure of some productions or texts requires a full understanding of the social context, and should therefore not be limited to a textual study alone.

In our current world, where individual countries are becoming more and more multicultural within themselves, understanding the societal implications of cultural exchanges becomes ever more complex and fundamental. Although one tends to rely primarily on the social sciences to reflect on society thanks to their quantitative and empirical investigations, the aim of this conference is to show that the theory and practice of theatre translation can significantly benefit our understanding.

In turn, we hope to see how the field of theatre translation can benefit from the methodologies of social sciences. In recent decades, the concepts and methodologies of theatre translation have recurrently been questioned. For instance, the popular terms ‘performability’ and ‘speakability’, conveniently used to describe a poetics of reception and often criticised for their lack of theoretical framework, could be conceptualised further in light of these new tools.

Focus of scholarship on theatre translation has recently departed from the European-American sphere and developed a welcome extension into new geographical spaces. It is, therefore, all the more necessary to incorporate an input from the social sciences (anthropology, ethnography, sociology, history, politics, international relations etc.) into the discussion.

A particular focus will be given to stage performance, from the point of view of both the performers and the audience. Because performances tend to be historically and culturally-rooted, translations in performance bring practical insights into the target society. The recent thriving interest in performance of Latin and Greek plays, which obeyed radically different cultural codes to ours, could be of particular relevance to this conference.

Proposals from across humanities and social sciences are welcome. Papers should be 20 minutes long, and potential speakers are very welcome to propose a case study which may be open to new possible theorisations in the field of Translation Studies. They may want to consider the following themes, but need not treat the list as prescriptive or final:

Links between theatre translations/adaptations and shaping identities as a social group

          Relevance of quantitative research and theatre translation

          Lines of connections between theatre anthropology and theatre translation

          Translating ideology and political resonances

          Theatre translation as a political/social engagement

          Theatre translation and the history and theory of international relations

          Staging intercultural translations

          Rehearsal ethnography

          Theatre translation and sociolinguistics

          Multilingualism

          Theatre translation and comparative cultural studies

          Theatre translation and modern economics

          Theatre translation in history

          Cultural/social determinism in theatre translation

          Promotion of endangered cultures/social minorities through theatre translations

Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biography to
oxfordtheatretranslation@gmail.com before the 9th April 2017.