Tag Archives: London

CFP: Endgame(s) – GLITS

Endgame(s), GLITS (Goldsmiths Literature Seminar) Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference, June 9th 2017, Goldsmiths, University of London

Plenary Speaker: Professor Ivan Callus, University of Malta

Website: www.endgames2017.co.uk

We live in perilous times. Institutional decay, declining living standards, the collapse of social welfare, and potentially the end of liberal democracy all afflict our contemporary historical moment. Looming ecological and migratory issues transcend the limits of what we think and feel to be possible, threatening us in ways we are unable to imagine, let alone rationalise. Yet, there is a profound sense that every epoch has its own ‘endgame’; that every society recognises itself as itself in the vision of its own future demise. Endgames consequently populate the historical record, from the Millenarianism of the medieval world and the fin de siècle culture of Mitteleuropa, to the historical ends that the mythologies of Fascism and Stalinism sought to bring about, to anxieties of nuclear holocaust and the Y2K millennium bug and – more recently – Brexit. It seems that the apocalypse, by definition, must be repeatable. In 1925 T.S. Eliot captured appositely the sense of resultant disaffection and numbness – even frustration – this engenders: ‘This is the way the world ends, Not with a bang but a whimper.’

However, living in the end-times can also be exhilarating, even liberating. A German expression encapsulates this hedonism: ‘Tanz auf dem Vulkan [dancing on the volcano]’. The end-times – different from the mere knowledge of our individual mortality – can trigger an ecstatic sense of being, perhaps even a means to bridge the intersubjective gaps that lie between us and forge new collective possibilities. Thus, leading us to the imagining of termination for positive affect; bringing current socio-economic and political systems to their [il]logical conclusions; repurposing technology for socially beneficial and emancipatory ends.

This conference seeks to explore the way in which literature and narrative cultures order and represent visions of the end of the world and how this constitutes a pervasive influence on philosophy, political theory and popular culture. We invite papers that discuss ways of thinking and feeling in the end times, those of the past, present and, inevitably, those endgames still to be played out in the future.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Literature of resistance, dissidence, change, from the middle-ages to 21st Century.
  • The end of literature and the contemporary novel.
  • Borders and limits in relation to migration, displacement, and refuge.
  • Apocalypse, catastrophe and revelation.
  • Climate-change, environmental disaster, and eco-criticism.
  • Corruption, decadence, degradation, decay.
  • Endgames and end-times in popular culture.
  • Epochality, historicity, temporality.
  • Technology and media.
  • Post-truth and Post-fact discourses.

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20 minute papers, short creative pieces, and readings, from all postgraduate students by Friday 31st March to be sent to the conference organisers David Cross and Marc Farrant at endgames2017@gold.ac.uk – Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words. Please include details of your current level of study and home institution. For creative readings, please send a short example of your work.

Majorities and Minorities: Literature and Identities, Text and Context, SOAS University of London

Majorities and Minorities: Literature and Identities, Text and Context, 28th April 2017, SOAS University of London

“Minor literature is not the literature of a minor language but the literature a minority makes in a major language.” Deleuze and Guattari

“The three characteristics of minor literature are the deterritorialization of language, theconnection of the individual to a political immediacy, and the collective assemblage ofenunciation.”  Deleuze and Guattari

What makes individuals or communities belong to the minority or the majority? How do authors’ positions within the minority-majority paradigm influence their fiction? Can we even formulate what minorities are? Do they have to be a minority in regard to a specific majority? Is it possible to define a majority? What does being marginal mean and how is it expressed in a work of art? How does the nation figure in defining minorities and majorities? What is the nation-state’s role in minor-major relations?

This conference will focus on the many different kinds of minority voices emanating from South Asia in the decades since independence. Any South Asian language and any form of minority identity is welcome.  By bringing scholars researching different voices from different languages in South Asia we aim to foster a dialogue that will help develop a South Asian paradigm of Minor Literature and help to identify the role of the state and different parallels across the subcontinent.

We would like to invite all scholars working on Indian or other South Asian literatures to submit an abstract on any of these or related areas.

 Caste and community

 Gender and sexualities

 Religions and traditions

 Marginalised geographies

 Poverty and class

 Minor literature in nationalisms and regionalisms

Paper proposals should include a title, 300-word abstract, institutional affiliation and contact information. Please submit proposals via email by January 15 2017 at the following address: samconference2017@gmail.com

IES SAS Comparative Modernisms, ‘From Avant-Garde to Architecture (and Back)’

Comparative Modernisms Seminar, Institute of English Studies- School of Advanced Study, University of London.

21 November 2016, Room 246, Senate House, Malet St, London, Room 246, 18:00 – 20:00

Professor Tyrus Miller (University of California-Santa Cruz)

From Avant-Garde to Architecture (and Back)

Abstract: This paper considers the complex interactions of the historic avant-gardes with the symbolic idea, theory, and practice of modern architecture. Considering a number of cases including Malevich, Mondrian, Van Doesburg, Lajos Kassák, Moholy-Nagy, and El Lissitzky, I will discuss and assess Reyner Banham’s classic hypothesis that the avant-gardes played a crucial role for modern architecture in providing an “aesthetic discipline,” from outside of the architectural discipline, to make sense of various technical innovations, new materials, and emergent idioms of design. At the same time, for several avant-gardists architecture was invested with the dream of reinventing a totality lost among the multiplicity of incommensurable metropolitan sign-systems and forms: as a kind of utopian meta-art in which the autonomous languages of the various art-media, and even various extra-artistic dialects and functional idiolects, might be subsumed into a new, architectonic metalanguage assuring inter-translatability and social efficacy.

Tyrus Miller is Professor of Literature at the University of California at Santa Cruz. He is author of Late Modernism: Politics, Fiction, and the Arts Between the World Wars (U of California P, 1999); Singular Examples: Artistic Politics and the Neo-Avant-Garde (Northwestern UP, 2009); Time Images: Alternative Temporalities in 20th-Century Theory, History, and Art (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009); and Modernism and the Frankfurt School (Edinburgh UP, 2014). He is the editor of Given World and Time: Temporalities in Context (Central European UP, 2008) and the Cambridge Companion to Wyndham Lewis (Cambridge UP, 2016). He is the translator/editor of György Lukács, The Culture of People’s Democracy: Hungarian Essays on Literature, Art, and Democratic Transition (Brill, 2012) and series co-editor of Brill’s Lukács Library series.

The seminar is  free and open to all.  However, for reasons of room capacity, please register your participation by contacting  the Seminar convenor, Dr Angeliki Spiropoulou, Visiting Research  Fellow at IES/SAS and Assist. Professor at Peloponnese University at  angeliki.spiropoulou@sas.ac.uk

Frank O’Hara, Poet in the City

Poet in the City, ‘Frank O’Hara: In the Heart of Noise’, Wed 9th Nov, 7.30pm, Kings Place, 90 York Way, N1 9AG. Duration: 2 hours 20 mins (with 20 min interval), £14.50

Poet in the City, in collaboration with Aurora Orchestra, present a special evening of poetry, music and art in celebration of Frank O’Hara, 50 years since his death.

From curating with Jackson Pollock and de Kooning to creating work inspired by John Cage and Billie Holiday, O’Hara was at the restless heart of the 1960s creative explosion and the ‘New York School’; legions of devoted followers have ensued since his death at 40. Featuring poet and critic Mark Ford, players from Aurora Orchestra and the acclaimed soprano Nina Bennet, join us to explore the great legacy of this ceaseless soul.

Mark Ford is the editor of Frank O’Hara’s Selected Poems, and of two anthologies of the work of the New York School Poets. He teaches in the English Department at University College London.

Will Montgomery is Senior Lecturer in English Literature, and Director of the Poetics Research Centre at Royal Holloway University. His recent publications include the essay collection Frank O’Hara Now. Will also works with audio, making field recordings, sound art and music.

Nina Bennet is a talented soprano, having performed with both the City of London Sinfonia and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. Nina is becoming increasingly in demand in contemporary music and is equally at home in both jazz and gospel.

John Reid is Principal Piano of Aurora Orchestra, with whom he has appeared at the major London concert venues, and at the BBC Proms. He is an associate of the Royal Academy of Music.

Jane Mitchell is Principal Flute of Aurora Orchestra and plays in ensembles in the UK, France and Germany on both period and modern flutes. A member of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, she works regularly with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra, and L’Orchestre des Champs-Elysées.

More information about the event can be found here.
frank-o-hara

BCLA Autumn Graduate Reception: Afterlives

BCLA Autumn Graduate Reception: Afterlives

17.00-19.00, 7th November 2016, Room G24, Foster Court, Malet Place University College London

We are pleased to announce that the British Comparative Literature Association will be hosting a Graduate Reception on the evening of 7 November 2016. BCLA Graduate Receptions are friendly evening seminars which offer postgraduates working in Comparative Literature and related fields the opportunity to present their work to peers and academics, followed by an informal wine reception.

The theme for this year’s Autumn Reception is “Afterlives”. We have three postgraduate speakers: Federica Coluzzi (University of Manchester), Eirini Apanomeritaki (University of Essex), Simone Calabrò (University of Edinburgh). They will each be giving a 20-minute paper on any aspect of their research in Comparative Literature that addresses literature’s multiple afterlives, such as socio-political, ethical, aesthetic, scientific, theoretical, mythical, and so on, or examines the way in which afterlives have come to shape the past, present, and future of comparative literature.

Programme

17.00-17.10 Welcome and Introduction by Professor Elinor Shaffer FBA, School of Advanced Studies, University of London and UCL.

17.10-17.40 Awarding Ceremony for the 2016 BCLA Arthur Terry Postgraduate Essay Prize, presented by Professor Naomi Segal, Birkbeck.

Graduate Papers

17.40-18.00 The Religious Afterlife of Dante’s Divine Comedy in Philip H. Wicksteed’s Six Sermons – Federica Coluzzi (University of Manchester)

18.00 – 18.20 Myths of the Afterlife in E. Fakinou’s The Seventh Garment – Eirini Apanomeritaki (University of Essex)

18.20-18.40 Autofiction as a Political Act: The Afterlives of Writers’ Public Image (Simone Calabrò, University of Edinburgh)

18.40-19.00 Q&A discussion

The talks will be followed by a wine reception and an opportunity for informal discussion

All welcome. Admission is free of charge.

Hosted by: the Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry, University College London.

BCLA Postgraduate Representatives: Niall Sreenan, Stefano Rossoni, and Stanislava Dikova

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BCLAUK

Twitter: @BCLApostgrad

E-mail: bclapgrepresentative@gmail.com