Tag Archives: SOAS

CFP: The Danger of Words in an Age of Danger, Exiled Ink/CCLPS (SOAS)

The Danger of Words in an Age of Danger, Exiled Ink/CCLPS (SOAS), Saturday 1 April

This one-day symposium sets out to examine the contemporary danger of words as it affects exiled writers and some minorities. It will interrogate diverse aspects of the ‘Danger of Words’, from denying exiled writers the freedom to write about the ills in their societies, to the manipulation of words  by dark and sinister forces in our established democracies and the way this affects writers.

Exiled Writers and scholars will examine the ramifications of the country of origin’s continuing censorship of exiled writers’ literary production post exile and of the silencing in the country of destination, in relation to the writers’ literary, aesthetic and ontological negotiation and resistance to it. Exiled literary voices will articulate their responses to the implosion of liberalism in the country of origin and the crisis of liberalism throughout Europe with the rise of the xenophobic right, and of the US right. In a further session on the danger of words, Jewish and Muslim poets will express their own nuanced and varied personal subjectivities and narratives resisting the simplistic and dangerous identities imposed on them.

The symposium will conclude with an exiled writers’ poetry recital.

For information and to send title and abstracts (by 15 March) contact: Jennifer@exiledwriters.fsnet.co.uk

Landscapes of a Lyric Empire, SOAS

Landscapes of a Lyric Empire, Dr Fatima Burney (SOAS), Wednesday 8th March 2017, 3.15pm – 5pm, B111, Brunei Gallery, SOAS, London WC1H 0XG.

This talk will present the comparative poetics of Sir William Jones to demonstrate the role of orientalist readings of ghazals in the history of lyricization. Jones was one of the first litterateurs to treat ‘lyrick’ as a universal category and to translate Persian ghazals as ‘lyricks’ – a designation which has remained within ghazal scholarship and comparative models of literary reading to this day. Jones also published several essays on ‘asiatick’ literature that significantly influenced the reception of Persian poetry in English reading publics. This talk highlights the significance of ‘nature’ as a conceptual paradigm in Jones theory of universal poetic form. While Jones’ insistence on the ‘rustic’ genius of ‘asiatick’ poetry was certainly helpful in promoting Persian (and Arabic) poetry to European readers, it entailed converting the products of a cosmopolitan Persianate writing network into objects of a rustic proto-European literary practice.

Dr. Fatima Burney is a Postdoctoral Research fellow at the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies at SOAS. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California Los Angeles in 2017. Fatima’s doctoral dissertation compares Anglophone and Urdu literary romantic movements in the eighteenth and nineteenth century, particularly in their reception and representation of ghazal poetry. At SOAS, Fatima’s research will focus on the North Indian case study of the Multilingual Locals and Significant Geographies research project.

Free event, no registration required. More information can be found here.

Marvellous Thieves, Book Launch, SOAS

 

Marvellous Thieves: Secret Authors of The Arabian Nights (Harvard UP) by Paulo Lemos Horta. 16th February, 6-8pm.

Drinks reception

Free entry

Room G3, Main Building, SOAS, Thornhaugh Street, London WC1H 0XG

Copies of the book will be available to buy at a discounted price.

“This fine book … cogently probes an influential period in the knotted and at times sordid history of the Arabian Nights, serving as a fine example to those unraveling this promiscuous and forever malleable set of stories.”— The Wall Street Journal

 

Landscapes of Realism, SOAS

Landscapes of Realism: Workshop 5. ICLA Project (supported by the Leverhulme Trust Network Fund), 17 and 18 February 2017, S209 (Senate House, North Block), SOAS, University of London

Topic 1: Institutions and Ideologies of Realism: mapping out realist conventions; readership and expectations; canonization; production and circulation.

Topic 2: Cultural Encounters: (a) comparative study of how realist texts portray the other, the foreigner, stereotypes; and (b) the overlap and divergence between truth and reality in theories of knowledge and representation in non-European philosophical and critical traditions. How is Realism to be understood within a worldview that sees reality as illusion and its transcendence or abandonment as homecoming? What if experienced reality contradicts directly received divine truths? What then is real and how is it known and theorized? What impact do such worldviews have on the representation of what can be seen, heard, sensed, and comprehended, and on the development of non-European aesthetics and relevant literary theories? More crucially, what happens to the non-European theories and modes of representation when they encounter European Realism in the C19 and C20? How may non- European responses to Realism be explained within the broader context of imperialism, colonialism, resistance and revolution? How does Realism serve as both framework and foil for non- European interrogation of both Eastern and Western traditions of critical thought on the true and the real?

Workshop 1: Friday 17 February 2017

Institutions and Ideologies of Realism

10:00-10:15 Arrival tea & coffee

10:15-10:30 Welcome Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS) and Simon James (Durham)

10:30-12:00

Chair: Simon James (Durham)

Newspapers and their Beginnings: Fiction, Journalism, Realism

Edmund Birch (Churchill College, Cambridge)

‘A space of stunted grass and dry rubbish’: realism and ‘equal ground’

Simon Grimble

Women, Work, and Periodical Literature

Margaret Higonnet (University of Connecticut)

12:00-13:00 Sandwich lunch

13:00-15:00

Chair: Simon James (Durham)

Melodrama, Theatricality and Realism

Jeremy Tambling

Global Capitalism and the Novel

Bashir Abu-Manneh (Kent)

Literature and Education in the 1930s: Arthur Calder-Marshall and Winifred Holtby on Schools

Matthew Taunton (UEA)

Experimentation and Innovation in the Twentieth Century, Social Realist Short Story

Anthony Patterson

15:00-15:30 Break tea & coffee

Workshop 2 (a): Friday 17 February 2017

Cultural Encounters

15:30 to 17:00

Chair: Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS)

The Fictitiousness of Reality: Ḥussein Barghoutī’s Conception of Realism

Haneen Omari (Leiden University)

Respondent: Bashir Abu-Manneh (Kent)

Displaced Realisms: Machado de Assis in the 19th and 20th century

Paulo Lemos Horta (New York University Abu Dhabi)

Respondent

The Transmedia and Transcultural Hyperrealism of Ai Weiwei’s Digital Communication

Daria Berg and Giorgio Strafella (University of St.Gallen, Switzerland)

Respondent: Steen Bille Jorgenson

18:30 Workshop dinner

Workshop 2 (b) Saturday 18 February 2017

Cultural Encounters

10:00-10:30 Arrival tea & coffee

10:30-12:30

Chair: Alena Rettrova (SOAS)

Time and Space: A First Sketch

Svend Erik Larsen and Rosa Mucignant

What if experienced realty contradicts directly received divine truths?

Stephen Hart (UCL)

Realism at the Peripheries

Ulka Anjaria (Brandeis University)

Realism and Other

Midori Atkins (Independent Scholar)

12:30 -13:30 Sandwich lunch

13:30-15:00

Chair: Stephen Hart (UCL)

Russian idleness, European business: work and commerce in 19th-century Russian realism (Andrea Zink, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Cultural Determinism: The Emergence of the Statistical ‘Real’ in the 19th Century

Genie Babb (SUNY Plattsburgh)

The Colonial Gaze and its Critics in Nineteenth-Century German Realism

Dirk Göttsche (Nottingham)

Respondent: Alena Rettrova (SOAS)

End of Public Programme

15:00-15:30 Break tea & coffee

15:30 to 17:30 Business meeting (Network members only)

18:30 Workshop dinner

Abstracts can be found here.

Capitals: A Poetry Anthology, SOAS

Wednesday 1st February 2017, 17.15-19.00, B111, Brunei Building, The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, WC1H 0XG

Book launch: CAPITALS, a new poetry anthology on the capital cities of the world, edited by Abhay K. and published by Bloomsbury. The contributors from UK  include Ruth Padel, George Szirtes, Mimi Khalvati, Clive Wilmer, Pascale Petit, Todd Swift among others.

Introduced by Abhay K. and Frances Grahl (CCLPS, SOAS) There will be readings by Mathura, Ahsan Akbar, Imruh Bakri, Steven J. Fowler, Michael Glover, Ruth Padel, Meg Pierce, Sarah Soorbrayen, George Szirtes, Clive Wilmer.

Wine and copies of the book will be available.