Tag Archives: University of Oxford

CFP: Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

Translation into Theatre and the Social Sciences

16th-17th June 2017

University of Oxford, St Hilda’s College/ Faculty of Classics

Keynote speakers:

Carole-Anne Upton (Middlesex University London)

Margherita Laera (University of Kent)

Lorna Hardwick (The Open University)

Liliane Campos (Université Paris Sorbonne-Nouvelle)

The poetics of theatre translation and adaptation is often dependent on the intimate knowledge of the expectations of the target audience. Understanding the evolution of theatre translations, the success or failure of some productions or texts requires a full understanding of the social context, and should therefore not be limited to a textual study alone.

In our current world, where individual countries are becoming more and more multicultural within themselves, understanding the societal implications of cultural exchanges becomes ever more complex and fundamental. Although one tends to rely primarily on the social sciences to reflect on society thanks to their quantitative and empirical investigations, the aim of this conference is to show that the theory and practice of theatre translation can significantly benefit our understanding.

In turn, we hope to see how the field of theatre translation can benefit from the methodologies of social sciences. In recent decades, the concepts and methodologies of theatre translation have recurrently been questioned. For instance, the popular terms ‘performability’ and ‘speakability’, conveniently used to describe a poetics of reception and often criticised for their lack of theoretical framework, could be conceptualised further in light of these new tools.

Focus of scholarship on theatre translation has recently departed from the European-American sphere and developed a welcome extension into new geographical spaces. It is, therefore, all the more necessary to incorporate an input from the social sciences (anthropology, ethnography, sociology, history, politics, international relations etc.) into the discussion.

A particular focus will be given to stage performance, from the point of view of both the performers and the audience. Because performances tend to be historically and culturally-rooted, translations in performance bring practical insights into the target society. The recent thriving interest in performance of Latin and Greek plays, which obeyed radically different cultural codes to ours, could be of particular relevance to this conference.

Proposals from across humanities and social sciences are welcome. Papers should be 20 minutes long, and potential speakers are very welcome to propose a case study which may be open to new possible theorisations in the field of Translation Studies. They may want to consider the following themes, but need not treat the list as prescriptive or final:

Links between theatre translations/adaptations and shaping identities as a social group

          Relevance of quantitative research and theatre translation

          Lines of connections between theatre anthropology and theatre translation

          Translating ideology and political resonances

          Theatre translation as a political/social engagement

          Theatre translation and the history and theory of international relations

          Staging intercultural translations

          Rehearsal ethnography

          Theatre translation and sociolinguistics

          Multilingualism

          Theatre translation and comparative cultural studies

          Theatre translation and modern economics

          Theatre translation in history

          Cultural/social determinism in theatre translation

          Promotion of endangered cultures/social minorities through theatre translations

Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief biography to
oxfordtheatretranslation@gmail.com before the 9th April 2017.

Sean O’Brien Lectures, St Anne’s College, Oxford

‘For Dreams are Licensed as they Never Were’5.30pm in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne’s College, University of Oxford. All welcome.

Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in Comparative European Literature, Sean O’Brien. 

Tuesday 7 February 2017 ‘For dreams are licensed as they never were’. What becomes of the history poem?

Tuesday 14 February 2017 Displacement: Irish poetry and poets of Irish descent in Britain.

Tuesday 21 February 2017 ‘I only am escaped alone to tell thee’ or ‘The Faster We Go the Rounder We Get’.

Tuesday 28 February 2017 In Conversation with Patrick McGuinness.

Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation: Nicky Harman on Jia Pingwa, Wed 15 February 2017, 17:15 – 19:15. St Anne’s College, Oxford, Seminar Room 3.

The Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation research programme is delighted to host acclaimed literary translator Nicky Harman to give a masterclass on Chinese to English literary translation. During the course of the evening, we will focus on unpicking a single paragraph by author Jia Pingwa. Concentrating on the final paragraph of Jia’s 2007 novel Happy (《高兴》), we will look at the process of a working translator, with an eye to issues particular to Chinese-English translation. Through examining both the translator’s drafts and and her final version, we will discuss the practical problems of translation, starting with sentence structure, terminology and (nick)names. Nicky will then unpick the cultural references, both implicit and explicit, and finally consider the author’s intentions for this paragraph. The conversation with then open up for discussion, as the translator poses the question of whether her translation has succeeded in recreating the same effect in English.

All are welcome. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary. A few short preparatory readings will be circulated in advance to facilitate audience participation. Please register on eventbrite in order to receive the introductory readings. Please come prepared to ask questions!

Please contact Kate Costello with any questions about the event or registration.

OCCT Hilary 2017

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation

 Hilary 2017 Events

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Dr Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

Week 3 – “(Re)writing Fragments”: Reflections on Translating Poetry

Mon. 30 January 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Sarah Ekdawi (Oxford); Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford); Graduate Respondent: Spyros Karelas (Athens/Oxford); Chair: Eleni Philippou (Oxford)

Week 3 – Fiction and Other Minds: Modalities of Reading

Wed. 1 February 2017, 5:15 -7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Naomi Rokotnitz (Oxford); Renate Brosch (Stuttgart); Chair: Ben Morgan (Oxford)

Week 4 – “Forgotten Europe”: Translating Marginalised Languages

Thurs. 9 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: Peter Mackridge (Oxford); Antonia Lloyd-Jones; Paul Vincent (UCL); Sarah Death; Chair: Kasia Szymanska (Oxford)

Week 5 – Masterclass in Chinese to English Literary Translation

Wed. 15 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Nicky Harman; Chair: Kate Costello (Oxford)

(No knowledge of Chinese required, to register refer to OCCT website)

Week 6 – Translation as Afterlife

Wed. 22 February 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College

Speakers: Marcela Sulak (Bar Ilan); Adriana X. Jacobs (Oxford); Chair: Matthew Reynolds (Oxford)

Week 7: Writing an Academic Review

Wed. 1 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room 3, St Anne’s College

Speaker: Marilyn Booth (Oxford); Chair: Dennis Duncan (Oxford)

Week 8: Online and Offline Forums for Cultural Production

Wed. 8 March 2017, 5:15-7:15pm; Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Speakers: TBC

More details, including individual descriptions of each session, can be found here.

www.occt.ox.ac.uk; http://www.facebook.com/CompCritOxford; @OxfordCCT
Contact: comparative.criticism@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

Oxford Comparative Criticism, Michaelmas 2016

Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation is a research programme based jointly at TORCH, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, and the Centre for Comparative Criticism and Translation at St. Anne’s College.

Since 2013 our research programme brings together experts from the disciplines of English, Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies, and draws in collaborators from Classics, Music, Visual Arts, Film, Philosophy and History. We run seminars, workshops, conferences and a discussion group; we stage public events, such as Oxford Translation Day; and we edit a book series, Transcript, as well as an online journal, OCCT Review.

In Michaelmas 2016 the OCCT Discussion Group will follow a new format: we’ll be focussing on key issues in the methodology of comparative study. The sessions will begin with a short conversation between two senior members moderated by a graduate representative, followed by a discussion of the recommended readings. We hope to encourage graduates to think about their research within a comparative context, and contribute to creating a vibrant OCCT graduate community.

OCCT is a Divisional research programme supported by TORCH and St Anne’s College. Our organising committee includes Prof Matthew Reynolds, Prof Adriana X. Jacobs, Prof Mohamed-Salah Omri, Dr Eleni Philippou, Dr Peter Hill, Ms Karolina Watroba, Ms Kate Costello, Ms Valeria Taddei, Ms Kasia Szymanska, Prof Ben Morgan, Prof Patrick McGuinness.

An overview of the open events can be found here;  detailed descriptions of each event here.